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Robot Piloted by a Slime Mold

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 8 years ago | from the blob-of-borg dept.

Robotics 212

TeknoHog writes "Robotics researchers from the UK and Japan have linked up a slime mold to remotely control a six-legged robot. The mold, which is naturally light-sensitive, is able to hide the robot in dark corners, and the scientists expect to further this technology for use in smaller, autonomous units. There is also a preprint of the research paper available from the University of Southampton."

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well, i for one welcome our... (5, Funny)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713869)

oh, never mind

Re:well, i for one welcome our... (1)

Velox_SwiftFox (57902) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713905)

I was thinking "Gel-packs"?

well, at least they don't have to drill into a mammal's brain to do this one. The molds are cool though; a neighbor once panicked when a bright orange one appeared on wood chip mulch in his garden, until I told him what it was. "It's harmless and it eats bacteria" seems to be one of the more reassuring things you can tell someone about a creeping slime.

Re:well, i for one welcome our... (1)

B3ryllium (571199) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713988)

Is that the bright orange/yellow pouffy one? I've seen one of those before. At least I think it was mold. Maybe it was an alien?

Well, whatever it was, I squished it.

Re:well, i for one welcome our... (5, Funny)

Isotopian (942850) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714208)

What's the fun in doing robot experiments if you don't get to drill into any brains? I'll tell you, no fun at all.

Re:well, i for one welcome our... (1)

gold23 (44621) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714021)

Thank you. Exactly the post I had in mind.

The Slime Mold Hits You For 4 Pts... (2, Funny)

Trikenstein (571493) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714050)

Slime Mold: "You call that a proper welcome for your Over Lord?"

Ooo! Ooo! I wanna do this one! (1)

SeaFox (739806) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714104)

I for one welcome our new invertebrate overlords, and their psychicly controlled killing robots which will help them enslave the human race.

oh comon just say it... (1)

Heembo (916647) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714218)

I for one welcome our light-sensitive autonomous slide mold human-killer-robot-pilot overlords!

It's like politicians directing civilization ... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14714517)

>> Well, I for one welcome our...

It wouldn't be such a big change, since since we already have slimy overlords.

At least real slime molds aren't susceptible to bribery and corruption, and have far higher competence in the area that they are directing.

That's nothing (3, Funny)

aussie_a (778472) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713878)

Re:That's nothing (1)

laptop006 (37721) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713975)

Yes, but that was from a "Genuine Non-Accredited University"!

Re:That's nothing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14714015)

So a robot piloted by a lawyer? What's the big deal?

Don't trust the slime mold! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14714588)

Once they get machine guns you'll see how dumb they are.

Klaus-Peter Zauner's most recent publication. (3, Informative)

wilburdg (178573) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713891)

If you're interested in the subject, check out Klaus-Peter Zauner's publication: Robot Control: From Silicon Circuitry to Cells [soton.ac.uk]

is there some reason that... (5, Funny)

Dance_Dance_Karnov (793804) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713893)

a photocapacitor or some other light sensitive electronics wouldn't suffice?

Re:is there some reason that... (3, Interesting)

nick_davison (217681) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713913)

a photocapacitor or some other light sensitive electronics wouldn't suffice?

Simple:

"Robot controlled by light sensitive electronics seeks corner" gets a quick nod before someone realises eight year olds have been doing it with the basic Lego Mindstorms kit for years.

"Slime mold remotely controls six legged robot" gets the quirky and weird headlines. Quirky and weird headlines can be claimed as public interest. Public interest can be parlayed in to additional funding for your otherwise unfundable project.

So, whilst it's not really any more exciting, it does get the trivia audience - which gets the funding. Thus, for PhDs who can't get Google to hire them, it's essential to use a cockroach or slime mold or something similarly quirky to keep you in tweed jackets and leather elbow patches.

Re:is there some reason that... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14713945)

How about you read the paper then comment. There is the possibility that chance will render your conclusions correct - but first read the damned paper.

You can then follow-up with a critique of all those pretender PhDs that have won Nobel Prizes, and the countless fraudsters in the university system.

How about - you've arm chaired the problem now it's time to present the overwhelming evidence (not testimonials). I will also ask that you stratify the various classes of PhDs so as to avoid generalizations.

Re:is there some reason that... (5, Insightful)

jheath314 (916607) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714159)

IMHO, the whole point was to do it with a biological interface.

Think about it... a slime mold, while naturally light-avoidant, won't naturally know how to manipulate robotic appendages. Rather than sneering dismissively, you might realize this is a significant step forward to creating hardware and software that can directly interface with your nervous system. Such technology has many awesome as well as frightening implications.

Re:is there some reason that... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14713923)

The slime mold is analog, not digital. It's arguably more suitable for interaction with the real world (analog world.) Also, you are likely to get interesting behavioral artefacts as a result of using biological components as a control mechanism (presumably, the robot will behave more like a biological organism.)

Re:is there some reason that... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14714020)

The universe at a sufficient scale is probably discrete, not continuous. Not that this matters at all in this case where the movements of the mould are sampled discretely for making control decisions in the robot. Modeling the behavior of this single-celled organism into a NFA would actually be pretty easy. The claimed advantage is that at a sufficiently-small scale using material harvested from organisms adapted to certain behaviors will be more efficient than attempting to replicate the functionality using molecular structures designed by humans to reproduce their behavior. This is probably a non-starter for now, since integrating these compounds into a lithographic process simply isn't feasible.

Re:is there some reason that... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14714321)

There isn't anything that is analog, everything is digital (discrete or quantized). You can count in whole integers the photons, neurons, sodium ions traversing cellular membranes, etc, as far down as you want to go. Only when the quantity exceeds the resolution of your inspection does it appear to be analog. That said there's still merit in using things that appear continuous simply because they have a much higher degree of resolution and therefore precision.

No cameras yet rival the human eye, yet both are, in their way, digital.

Re:is there some reason that... (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713944)

I got the impression that the slime mold was telling the legged robot not only which way to move but how to move its legs. i.e., if you give a slime mold legs it will figure out how to use them to do what slime molds like to do (hide in the dark).

Re:is there some reason that... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14714357)


Exactly.

And that's what makes this seriously cool.

Re:is there some reason that... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14714073)

Any success with meshing bio and electro is pretty nifty. I don't understand why your aren't impressed. Yea, they could have used electrical components to do this -- that wouldn't be news. Try reading the article.

And the parent doesn't strike me as "insightful".

Not impressed! (5, Funny)

gasmonso (929871) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713894)

The mold in my shower has been doing this kinda stuff for years!

http://religiousfreaks.com/ [religiousfreaks.com]

Re:Not impressed! (4, Funny)

robertjw (728654) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713937)

Hell, the mold in my shower just stole my car.

Re:Not impressed! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14714212)

it's not stealing if it's court-ordered, bub. next she's "stealing" half your paycheck to raise her slimy off-spring, isn't she?

Living brain controls flight simulator (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14713900)

Similar study last year. Experimental "brain" (25,000 living neurons, taken from a rat's brain and cultured inside a glass dish) interacts with an F-22 fighter jet flight simulator through a specially designed multi-electrode array and a desktop computer

http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/11/02/brain.dish/ [cnn.com]

I remember that... (1)

Zantetsuken (935350) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714007)

I remember that... last I knew of it, it could only keep the plane (simulator in level flight, but even so its really something and is a start towards non-human pilots and learning just how brains are formed and work.

Re:Living brain controls flight simulator (1)

TaoJones (10412) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714459)

So how long before that exact scenario is a plot on a cheesy SciFi Channel Movie?

Biological sensors are and are not new... (4, Interesting)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713901)

The news is that people are able to now work with them. Light sensors based on silicon and other materials simple take advantage of the light sensitive properties of the material. Using a biological material is no different, other than the need to 'feed' the sensor. As this story and experiment play out, there is no ready made practical application waiting for its development. The real advance here is working with biological sensors. Such work will hopefully lead to sensors that are sensitive enough to detect humans in the wreckage of a bombed building, or cancers (as some dogs can with smell) or other such sensitivities that simply don't seem possible with non-organic materials. This probably isn't going to lead to a bio-brain for robotics, but will make them much more sensitive in the sensor domain. Imagine if a robot could see or smell the way that some insects do? This would lead to robots that are much more capable, and much more useful for all sorts of dangerous work. Imagine a robot that works in water that can find even the tiniest of leaks on an oil tanker? Perhaps a robot that can sniff out drugs in cargo planes etc. The reason for sensors that are orders of magnitude better than what is available today goes without saying, more or less. This type of work will help make it more achievable, hopefully.

Already, they are training bees (in minutes) to sense out things that takes months of training for dogs. This type of bio-sensor systems will hopefully make such work even easier to achieve. I can see that one day, a search and rescue helicopter can drop a truck load of independent water robots that seek out and locate humans in the middle of the ocean, saving lives by finding them faster than current methods, and bio-sensors may be the ticket to such advances.

That's my take...

Re:Biological sensors are and are not new... (3, Interesting)

woolio (927141) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713940)

Wouldn't such technologies suffer the same problems that people/animals face in hazardous/hostile environments?

What happens when a bio-sensor based robot walks into a cloud of chlorine gas? (e.g. chemical plant explosion/fire).

What about high-temperature environments?

What about cold/icy ones (e.g. avalanche)?

Radioactive areas? (e.g. dirty-bomb explosion)

Biological agents (viruses, pollen, etc)?

Wouldn't it also be difficult to maintain live cells in a machine? (e.g. what about food, water, oxygen, etc)?

Re:Biological sensors are and are not new... (1, Interesting)

jacksonj04 (800021) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714504)

Cockroaches are immune to the effects of radiation, unlike most microprocessors. Using a cockroach to control a robot means you can use much chunkier (physically), and therefore more radiation-resistant electronics because they don't have to do any 'thinking'.

Can't think of a use right now, but a trained cockroach perhaps?

Re:Biological sensors are and are not new... (2, Funny)

atokata (872432) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713985)

Already, they are training bees (in minutes) to sense out things that takes months of training for dogs. This type of bio-sensor systems will hopefully make such work even easier to achieve. I can see that one day, a search and rescue helicopter can drop a truck load of independent water robots that seek out and locate humans in the middle of the ocean, saving lives by finding them faster than current methods, and bio-sensors may be the ticket to such advances.

Oh, great, just what I need. A pack of ravenous killer bees attacking my groin because I happened to spill bong water on my pants before going through the bio-sensing sniffer bee line at an airport....

Re:Biological sensors are and are not new... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14714164)

Sorry to bust up the joke, but the wasps [usatoday.com] are kept in a plastic wand.

pilot? (2, Funny)

musonica (949257) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713903)

Thats no way to talk about the geeky research assistant holding the joystick... tho this description could be apt, I'm sure it applies to a fair few here on slashdot including myself after a late coding session (slimey, moldy, and avoiding light)

In other news... (5, Funny)

Txiasaeia (581598) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713906)

...attempts to merge a gelatinous cube with a Honda Civic have been less than successful. Kobold scientists blame this frustrating failure on a lower fuel efficiency due to the inefficient wind flow design. "We'd like to take these experiments to the next level," the designers said, "but we just don't have the experience at this time."

Re:In other news... (1)

JonToycrafter (210501) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714080)

I had a very similar thought to this, but yours is much funnier. I'd give you some karma if I had any.

meh (4, Funny)

Clover_Kicker (20761) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713912)

Let me know when they get a robot piloted by a gelatinous cube or a gibbering mouther.

Re:meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14714221)

Don't forget the Shoggoth...

Robots Need Top-Down AI (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14713919)

AI Algorithm Steps [visitware.com] describe how to create an artificial mind for robots.

Robot Artificial Intelligence [sourceforge.net] is more powerful than slime cells.

Tour the AI Theory of Mind [scn.org] for a deeper understanding.

Replaced by a Machine (0)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713920)

Cue the "backseat mother-in-law driver" jokes...

Employment Opportunity: (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14713924)

The Liberal Party of Canada is seeking anyone or anything to be the new party Leader.
Currently most human beings and other vertebrates have declined the oportunity.
Perhaps dark seeking slime molds could fulfill this roll. Cephalopods could also apply.

Re:Employment Opportunity: (1)

Hannah E. Davis (870669) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714138)

As awesome as it would be to have a robo-fungus prime minister/opposition leader, I'm afraid I'd be voting for the cephalopod. Ia fhtagn! :D

Let me guess... (3, Funny)

chriswaclawik (859112) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713951)

... this particular robot now favors unreasonably large subsidies to the slime mold planet, doesn't it?

Just what we need (4, Funny)

pair-a-noyd (594371) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713958)

moldy robots lurking in dark corners.
Am I the only one that finds this somewhat creepy?

Re:Just what we need (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713987)

moldy robots lurking in dark corners.
Am I the only one that finds this somewhat creepy?
Yes.

All the others were ambushed and killed by robots lurking in dark corners.

Re:Just what we need (1)

Skythe (921438) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714064)

Actually, i believe all the others were 'persuaded' by the brain parasites.

One of a kind.... (5, Funny)

aapold (753705) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713968)

when they finally made that pilot, they threw away the mold.

whoops.

They *WHAT* the mold? (1)

John Nowak (872479) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713978)

Broke the mold - 143,000 hits
Threw away the mold - 2,140 hits

Where do you people come up with this stuff? It's broke I say, broke!

Re:They *WHAT* the mold? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14714119)

Meh. I've noticed with things like this a lot of time geographic subcultures say it differently. Do you say "cut off the light" or "turn off the light?" Southern folk tend to use the former while most others use the latter.

In this case, either one works. If you're trying to complement someone/something "threw away the mold" is probably better, since its obvious that it was done after the fact. When you say they "broke the mold" there is some question as to whether the mold was broken during the process of forming the individual/item (which would suggest the individual/thing was abnormal) or whether they broke the mold after the process (which would suggest the person/thing is one of a kind).

Where's My Mech??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14713970)

How the hell was a slime mold able to get a mech before me?!?!?

I for one... (0, Offtopic)

guruevi (827432) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713990)

I for one welcome our new molded slimy robot-controlling overlords AND In Soviet America slimy molds control you (slimy molds being president/politicians/RIAA)

Re:I for one... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14714006)

You totally forgot to mention Natalie Portman naked, robotified, and covered in hot slime mold...

Re:I for one... (1)

John Nowak (872479) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714052)

Continue with that story and I'll be naked and covered with my own hot sl.. er ...

It wont be long (1)

Camel Pilot (78781) | more than 8 years ago | (#14713996)

until some idiot gets the user name slimmold and posts here and everyone will give him a 5 funny.

Re:It wont be long (1)

B3ryllium (571199) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714025)

You misspelled slimemold [slashdot.org] .

Slime-controlled robot overlords can have my... (3, Funny)

zymurgy_cat (627260) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714005)

...mold and mildrew remover when they pry it from my cold, dead hands.

What they don't say (1)

serutan (259622) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714012)

It hides from the light but gravitates toward Sarah Connor.

Doh... (2, Funny)

Apocalyps3 (885437) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714013)

Kinda wish I hadn't cleaned up earlier, I had a sandwich old enough to give Deep Blue a run for its money.

already got 6 billion+ of these roaming around. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14714014)

Robot Piloted by a Slime Mold

human = a very complex robot
human brain = big mass of slime/goo

So how is this news? We already have over 6 billion on the planet. :)

Ahh, why!?! (1)

WaR.KiN (805785) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714017)

Why did they have to do a nasty thing like that and take the pseudo out of pseudopod???? :(

There goes the insult... (1)

Deathbane27 (884594) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714019)

...about being slower than mold. :(

One's in office (1, Offtopic)

smvp6459 (896580) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714023)

No big deal...one's VP of the U.S. already.

Re:One's in office (4, Funny)

ratnerstar (609443) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714036)

That's completely inappropriate. Slime molds don't shoot people.

Re:One's in office (1)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714492)

Have some respect, thats your boss we are talking about!

Pffft...we've done better (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14714024)

Here in the US we've got a slime mold running our country.

Re:Pffft...we've done better (1)

Belseth (835595) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714163)

Here in the US we've got a slime mold running our country.

Is it fair to call Karl Rove a slime mold? Look what he's got to work with, he's doing the best he can.

Re:Pffft...we've done better (2, Insightful)

savorymedia (938523) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714220)

Modded INSIGHTFUL?!?

*rolls eyes so hard they fall out of their sockets*

Cue Dr. Who music. (4, Funny)

Irvu (248207) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714028)

Dalek [wikipedia.org] "little green blobs in bonded polycarbide armour". And it's even a british research team!

It's not just a slime mold.. (5, Funny)

kiyuki (954365) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714035)

It's intelligently designed!

Perfect for France. (0)

PopeOptimusPrime (875888) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714042)

This sounds like the perfect technology for France.
The robot army can just hide in the corner 'til America arrives to bail them out.

Um... this sounds familiar... but from where?... (5, Interesting)

ZeusAndHades (768527) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714046)

This sounds like something I would find in low level dungeons in Angband...

You hit the slime mold.
The slime mold hits you.
The slime mold's robot hits you.
You hit the slime mold.
The slime mold hits you.
The slime mold's robot hits you.
You miss the slime mold.
The slime mold hits you.
The slime mold's robot hits you.
You are dead.
-hit spacebar for high scores-

Re:Um... this sounds familiar... but from where?.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14714069)

It is a great idea. We could use this technology to create a whole army of slime controlled robots that hide in dark corners. AlQaeda are known to frequent dark corners and when they do BLAM!

Re:Um... this sounds familiar... but from where?.. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14714146)

Or Nethack...

What do you want to eat? [b-h or ?*] h

My, that was a yummy slime mold!

Need some turtles now... (2, Funny)

elguap0 (758827) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714074)

So they've invented Krang [wikipedia.org] ?

Whats happened to slashdot user base (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14714110)

When i see am interesting article on Slashdot, i like to click on "Read more" to see the comments. Often you find lots of posts from knowledgable people on the subject matter, who really contribute meaning and insight to the article. As of late though, it seems like the vast majority of comments are from people trying to be "funny". Funny is all well and fine, but it seems the articles most blasted with this tripe are the ones that are science based. What happened to the slashdot that used to be a feeding tough for real geeks?

Re:Whats happened to slashdot user base (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14714162)

Boobies!

I seem to remember (1)

Belseth (835595) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714121)

Wasn't there a Japanese movie about that? Godzilla verses Slimydra or something?

Dragon Quest reference (1)

ProstheticSwan (754025) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714130)

A slime approaches!

I am the controller (1)

dilvish_the_damned (167205) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714141)

...have linked up a slime mold to remotely control a six-legged robot...
Me, being in charge of personell, am generally viewed as slime, and I generally view my subjects as six-legged robots. So doing the math I fail to see this inovation as something more than curcumspect.

Creepy but... (1)

Snuggly_Soft (647073) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714148)

It still doesn't creep me out as much as Asimo.

Poor guy is going to get his research hijacked (2, Funny)

Darth (29071) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714193)

As cool as this is, i feel bad for the guy. But he's had plenty of warning.

It's just a matter of time before Davros hijacks his research to create the Daleks.

I'd welcome our new overlords, but... (1)

Khyber (864651) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714201)

They'll be too busy hiding in the dark for me to even notice them. :)

this will help my handcaped slime mold pet (1)

bxbaser (252102) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714203)

The poor thing cannot move on his own so every few hours i have to make sure he is in a dark enviroment.
With that robot thing my harry (harry is his name) can finally regain his mobility and lead a full life again.

Im so happy right now im crying, does anyone know where to buy these robots.

Serious comment (1)

INeededALogin (771371) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714226)

I am not impressed by this at all. If you read the article header, it makes it seem like the Green slime somehow controls the robot in a way that it knows it is moving the robot to a dark corner. Instead, all that has been done is to sense the natural movement of the slime away from light and carry those command over to a robot. This, for me, is no different than the way we make CG characters like Gollum in Lord of the Rings. This is no new technology, just a new subject with a nudge to force the slime to do something.

Re:Serious comment (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14714238)

Exactly. The first logical post so far. And this my friends is why I don't bother reading slashdot much anymore. Most of the articles are crap, and 99% of the replies are nonsense.

Re:Serious comment (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14714433)

and yet here you are, whining about how you don't read slashdot much anymore.

Job prospects yet for Darl then (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14714233)

Oh come on, I know it's group-think, but those mod points are burning a hole in your pocket.

I thought they were just for food (1)

Sippan (932861) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714242)

When is this going to be in Nethack?

World Domination (1)

bjoeg (629707) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714306)

What is wrong with this story. We actually give superhero suits to molds now.
Mars attacks go home, the new thing is Slime attacks.

It's Outsourcing Gone Made (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14714329)

Outsourcing of pilot jobs to slime mold, I tell ya it's insane. Sure they're cheap, sure they have MBAs from Harvard but what you save on the pilot costs you lose on the crashes and lawsuits and the uuurrrhhh slime.

the real question.. (2, Interesting)

dartarrow (930250) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714414)

...is can they win the fight against the koreans..? [slashdot.org]

[insert standard /. response] (1)

pidge-nz (603614) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714419)

I, for one, welcome our Robotic Slime-Mold Overlords.

Doesn't Bush have more important things to do? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14714470)

Robotics researchers from the UK and Japan have linked up a slime mold to remotely control a six-legged robot.

What the hell is Bush doing controling six-legged robots, anyway? He has more important things to worry about, like a failing economy, a botched war, and run away government spending.

Coming soon... (4, Funny)

zenmojodaddy (754377) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714485)

The future of law enforcement... Blobocop!

Sorry, that's all I have.

Already predicted! (2, Funny)

riflemann (190895) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714543)

1000 years from now even people will be controlled by slime [gotfuturama.com] . This is just the start! Resist the slime!

Holy Crap (1, Funny)

Gleng (537516) | more than 8 years ago | (#14714589)

Errr, I work at the University of Southampton. I just came into my office and read this while having my morning wake-me-up coffee.

Should I be shitting myself right about now?

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