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Water Logic Gates Built at MIT

CowboyNeal posted more than 7 years ago | from the flood-gates-opened dept.

Hardware Hacking 239

ndogg writes "This story is all wet. Paulo Blikstein at MIT has created a water computer. The one boolean logic gate he created functions as a half-adder (i.e. both XOR and AND). He then proceeded to create a four bit adder."

cancel ×

239 comments

lol MIT is for losers (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18035298)

lol

Re:lol MIT is for losers (1)

The Clockwork Troll (655321) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035568)

You are jealous because he got gain.

Hurm . . . (2, Funny)

OverlordQ (264228) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035308)

I wonder if the same principle could be used with hamsters and those little tubes they run around in . . .

*goes off to patent the Hamster Computer*

Re:Hurm . . . (4, Funny)

gardyloo (512791) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035368)

Richard Gere already has claim to that patent.

Re:Hurm . . . (1)

scoot80 (1017822) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035758)

does the hamster computer run linux??

Re:Hurm . . . (0, Redundant)

Toutatis (652446) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035902)

Why hamsters? It's much better if you use ants and mice.
As long as you have enough cheese.

Re:Hurm . . . (0, Redundant)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036222)

penguins and tuna !

this is very old news... (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18035318)

It's called fluidics, [wikipedia.org] and it's decades old.

It uses compressed air or water to create logic circuits.

There was a big interest during the cold war, since they wouldn't be affected by the electromagnetic pulse of a nuclear bomb.

Re:this is very old news... (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18035346)

We know. It says so in TFA.

Re:this is very old news... (5, Interesting)

mrbluze (1034940) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035416)

They have proven very useful in the medical field with respect to fluid logic ventilators, and possibly more sophisticated surgical equipment (aside from drills and saws which commonly are driven by compressed air). Many portable ventilators are commonly available which have no electronic parts to speak of and run on the pressurized air or oxygen that goes with the patient during transfer. More modern ones generate small amounts of electricity to power logic curcuits to achieve smoother or more configurable ventilation modes. Improving fluid logic to avoid this electronic dependency would be quite interesting whilst still keeping size down.

Just how water could play a part in ventilators escapes me, but such things as washing machines, dish washers and other appliances could benefit from not needing to use electricity.

I think the interest in this stuff, thankfully, goes beyond the cold war.

Re:this is very old news... (1)

Knutsi (959723) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036158)

To me water seems highly unpredictable though. Is is really possible to get any kind of computational accuracy from a device built like this?

Re:this is very old news... (3, Interesting)

mrbluze (1034940) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036250)

Water has been extensively studied, and fluid mechanics is a pretty well explored field, so I think water is well suited for the experiments. The thing that could be a problem as I see it is the speed of the system. The heavier the substance is, the greater force needed to change its direction, and the thing will be slower as a result.

Heh. (3, Funny)

jhantin (252660) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035490)

Guy L. Steele sketched this amusing commentary [catb.org] on problems in '70s fluidic computing, one episode of the Crunchly saga now entwined with the Jargon File [catb.org] .

Re:this is very old news... (5, Funny)

darkfish32 (909153) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035584)

Yeah, something tells me this isn't going to be the next Watergate....

Re:this is very old news... (3, Insightful)

Brandybuck (704397) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035712)

This isn't decades old. The device being reported on, that is. The concept is old, but the implementation is new. Despite your feeble protestations, it's still cool.

Re:this is very old news... (2, Insightful)

MrFlannel (762587) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035768)

The page is old too.
archive.org says the page was created April 2006, but I *know* I saw it before that as well.

Further research reveals this:
http://www.blikstein.com/paulo/projects/project_wa ter.html [blikstein.com]
which dates all the way back to 2004.

So yes, both the concept, and the site, are old.

what is not cool... (2, Insightful)

idlake (850372) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036168)

is that the people who did this at MIT failed to reference the prior work. Either they didn't know about it (which is profoundly stupid), or they deliberately didn't reference it (which is dishonest).

Automatic Transmissions, Gate Fan-Out (5, Interesting)

BigBlockMopar (191202) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035830)


It's called fluidics, and it's decades old. It uses compressed air or water to create logic circuits.

Yeah, I think the only real innovation here is describing the gates by Boolean concepts. His other accomplishment is no moving parts - except, of course, the fluid, I was expecting check balls and things; his system would probably work extremely well under very controlled pressure conditions... but I can't imagine there's much tolerance for real-world conditions or capacity for fan-out from the gates. Having said that, it's still a neat project. Kinda like the digital alarm clock I'm building using nothing but relays.

Automatic transmissions have used hydraulic computers since their genesis in the late 1940s. Until electronically-controlled transmissions became widespread in the 1980s, automatic transmissions universally had a maze of check valves, pressure-operated cylindrical valves and diaphragms in order to select gear. It was called the valve body, and it is probably the most terrifying part of a car to have scattered across your workbench - orders of magnitude worse than even a California emissions 1983 Rochester Quadrajet. Inputs include selected gear, downshift linkage, engine speed, tailshaft speed. Outputs are a set of lines which are pulled "hi" (in pressure not voltage!) to engage bands on the outsides of planetary gearsets and therefore engage a given gear.

Absolute nightmare. But they worked quite reliably - the valve bodies, anyway. The transmission itself was sometimes another matter (see hydraulic-controlled GM TH-200, Hondamatic, etc.). Ford C4 and C6 were one of the few to have a valve body design flaw - in Park, accumulated pressure would engage the reverse bands, causing the familiar scene from Cops: a Ford product reversing in driverless circles until it hits something. Shut off the engine when you get out of the driver's seat, and set your parking brake.

Re:this is very old news... (2, Insightful)

eric76 (679787) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035868)

I remember reading an article on this in Popular Science or Mechanics Illustrated back in the mid to late 60s.

I never did understand why noone else ever seemed to know of it. I figured maybe they didn't read Popular Science and Mechanics Illustrated.

Soooo old (2, Interesting)

Bruce Perens (3872) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035920)

I remember in the early 1960's, when my dad was working on the Lunar Module program at Grumman, he'd bring home engineering industry rags like Design News, and fluidic logic was the big thing then, there were always articles on it and press releases from manufacturers (most of whom probably didn't find many customers) about their new fluidic devices.

Fluidic technology has been explored for a backup computer for intrinsicaly-unstable aircraft, I'm not sure it's been deployed on any.

Bruce

Re:this is very old news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18035930)

A few of my colleagues have been looking into the effects of surface tension in various liquids and you'll be amazed to learn what you can do if you have the right circumstances.

H20 doesn't have that much surface tension because of its low valency, but other liquids such as bromine are held together by strong Van der Waals attractions meaning that they have much stronger surface tensions. In one famous experiment at MIT researches showed just how strong the surface tension could be by placing a cat onto a large pool of bromine and observing that not only did it not sink but that it could also move about (albeit with difficulty). Some people have suggested (tongue in cheek) that if Jesus could have introduced bromine into the red sea then that would explain how he could have walked on water.

Re:this is very old news... (2, Funny)

codeButcher (223668) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036074)

There was a big interest during the cold war, since they wouldn't be affected by the electromagnetic pulse of a nuclear bomb.

But wouldn't the cold from the cold war freeze the water?

(Ducks...)

Its been done... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18035322)

They should try mentos and pop soda gates

Give new meaning (5, Funny)

TodMinuit (1026042) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035324)

Gives a whole new meaning to the term "wetware".

Re:Give new meaning (5, Funny)

sokoban (142301) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035524)

Also gives a whole new meaning to the phrase "series of tubes".

Re:Give new meaning (5, Funny)

kfg (145172) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035536)

If they throw a little carbon tracer dye in the water they would end up with a "black adder".

KFG

Re:Give new meaning (2, Funny)

Storlek (860226) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036124)

So, is it water-cooled?

Wait for it.... (5, Interesting)

Duncan3 (10537) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035330)

Any second now, some archaeologist is gonna scream "So that's what that was!"

I can't wait to see the references in the paper :)

And then.... (4, Funny)

ArcherB (796902) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035344)

"This story is all wet. Paulo Blikstein at MIT has created a water computer. The one boolean logic gate he created functions as a half-adder (i.e. both XOR and AND). He then proceeded to create a four bit adder."

And then he proceeded to plug it in and electrocuted himself...

Re:And then.... (1)

uberchicken (121048) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036184)

NO MORE "And then" !!

Not exactly miniature. (1)

dxlts (1037812) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035350)

Try making an iPhone out of that!

Beowulf Cluster (5, Funny)

Inmatarian (814090) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035352)

Great idea... the ultimate water park. The path down the massive water slide would be controlled by the very calculations going on. People could be used as math symbols!

Re:Beowulf Cluster (1)

KingPrad (518495) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036232)

So I could be the alpha male outside of my own imagination! wheeeee!

Re:Beowulf Cluster (5, Funny)

jacobw (975909) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036294)

Water park? You are thinking too small, sir! This needs to be built as a continent-wide series of lakes and canals. For the first time, software pirates will be able to actually sail pirate ships on the job.

Oh No! (5, Funny)

Mr_Tulip (639140) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035360)

Get the mop, I've just had and arithmetic overflow error!

Re:Oh No! (4, Funny)

Harmonious Botch (921977) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035380)

Put the bit bucket under it!

Re:Oh No! (2, Funny)

smoker2 (750216) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035714)

Too much information !

Was talking to a friend about this a few days ago (4, Funny)

straponego (521991) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035372)

We were joking around, and I mentioned starting a Linux on Plumbing project. I should have known somebody at MIT would actually be working on it...

Heh. (2, Funny)

gardyloo (512791) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035376)

I bet this guy's nickname is Princess Nell. Lucky fellow.

Re:Heh. (1)

ianmorris (644822) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035894)

glad i'm not the only one who thought of that reference

Cooling? (2, Funny)

moloney (197410) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035392)

I wonder if he needs to water cool his computer?

Re:Cooling? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18035880)

No, he's got an overclocked AMD next to it to stop it from freezing.

slashdotted on oct/2003 (5, Informative)

atamyrat (980611) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035402)

From his home page [blikstein.com]

Water Computer (Slashdotted on Oct/2003)

Re: slashdotted on oct/2003 (1)

rickthewizkid (536429) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035444)

... and again feb/2007

Re: slashdotted on oct/2003 (1)

flanktwo (1041494) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035956)

so? It's time that this story was recycled.

Re: slashdotted on oct/2003 (1)

corsec67 (627446) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035526)

is it bad that I rember this article from the first time it was posted?

Re: slashdotted on oct/2003 (1)

Blikkie (569039) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035722)

Not necessarily bad, at least you keep up with the useless posts. At least this proves once again that duping on /. can take years.

Re: slashdotted on oct/2003 (1)

Bo'Bob'O (95398) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035730)

Dear god, this new technology can even predict the future!

Issues... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18035412)

With all the heat surrounding this announcement, I wonder how long it will take for it to become vaporware...

Re:Issues... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18035428)

mod parent up punny!

It's not a tank (4, Funny)

swordfishBob (536640) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035440)

It's a series of tubes!

Re:It's not a tank (2, Funny)

kfg (145172) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035858)

The batch run is going a bit slow today; hair clog. Somebody hand me the plunger so I can flush the system.

KFG

If you heat it up... (1)

ignavus (213578) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035446)

Apparently, if you heat it up, you have a steam-driven computer.

Re:If you heat it up... (1)

Walt Dismal (534799) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036170)

Apparently, if you heat it up, you have a steam-driven computer.

...That's called severe overclocking.

The Fluidics Operating System of choice would be.. (3, Funny)

eldurbarn (111734) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035448)

Windows, of course.

Being closed source, it should keep the water out. Maybe.

(Mind too tired: AND gates, XOR gates, BILL gates...)

Re:The Fluidics Operating System of choice would b (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18035476)

No, no, Windows is full of holes. :(

You can run fluidics with a variety of OSes! (4, Funny)

patio11 (857072) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035648)

Mac OS X -- Your computer needs water which is dyed a special shade of plastic white, is only available from one manufacturer, and costs about double what water usually costs. On the plus side, you chuckle every time you see the iFlow ads.

Gentoo -- You spend all of your day running submerge.

Windows 95 -- Your water has frozen. Press Ctrl-Alt-Del to reboot.

Windows 98 -- Your water got some virii in it while you were searching for water sports. I swear, they should put a warning label around the English language some days. You now need to buy some chlorine from one of the numerous providers who specialize in cleaning up Microsoft's messes.

Windows XP SP2 -- Your water suddenly looks a whole lot like plastic Fisher Price toy, but with your newfound determination to never, ever again search for watersports your system is actually pretty secure. Slashdot still makes fun of you, but they're all wet.

Windows Vista -- It looks like you're trying to NAND 0 and 1 together. Do you want to permit this action?

Re:You can run fluidics with a variety of OSes! (4, Funny)

BetterThanCaesar (625636) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035838)

I vote for Mac OS X - Because the processor already communicates fluently with the Aqua interface.

Yeah but (1)

finity (535067) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036020)

penguins live in the water...

Re:The Fluidics Operating System of choice would b (1)

kin52 (736527) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036090)

Run windows on this and you could drown from all the memory leaks.

Old news? (2)

dorpus (636554) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035450)

I remember reading identical news articles from the 1980s and 90s about "water circuits". How is this an innovation?

Cool But Old (1)

dcollins (135727) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035454)

I've been pointing my Intro to Computer Science students to that web page since 2003.

As a side issue, I kind of think that the specific photos Paulo has there are a tad mis-wired; it supposed to a full 2-bit adder, but doesn't quite work right if all 3 inputs are on (last time I looked at this was 2004, maybe someone can correct or confirm that).

Nonetheless, it's a great demonstration, kudos again to Paulo!

Re:Cool But Old (1)

julesh (229690) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036272)

As a side issue, I kind of think that the specific photos Paulo has there are a tad mis-wired; it supposed to a full 2-bit adder, but doesn't quite work right if all 3 inputs are on (last time I looked at this was 2004, maybe someone can correct or confirm that).

Yeah, I noticed that. He has four input pipes and four output pipes, but two of the outputs only depend on two inputs, so it can't work right, as in a correct adder, only the least significant bit has only two dependencies.

Re:Cool But Old (1)

julesh (229690) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036372)

Yeah, I noticed that. He has four input pipes and four output pipes, but two of the outputs only depend on two inputs, so it can't work right, as in a correct adder, only the least significant bit has only two dependencies.

In more detail, I'm looking at this picture: http://alumni.media.mit.edu/~paulo/courses/howmake /mlfab4bitaddertop.jpg [mit.edu]

From his description of the gates, and naming the inputs a1, b1, a2, b2 from top to bottom, the outputs (also from top to bottom) are:

o1 = a1 ^ b1
o2 = (a1 & b1) ^ (a2 & b2)
o3 = a1 & b1 & a2 & b2
o4 = a2 ^ b2

The correct outputs for an adder should be:

00 01 10 11
00 000 001 010 011
01 001 010 011 100
10 010 011 100 101
11 011 100 101 110
o1 = a1 ^ b1
o2 = a2 ^ b2 ^ (a1&b1)
o3 = a2&b2 | (a1&b1&(a2^b2))

Even if we join two of his output pipes to make an or to give the third bit, it doesn't look like any of those results are going to be right other than the least significant bit.

If, however, he swapped the two pipes coming out of the lower left-hand side half adder, he'd get:

o1 = a1 ^ b1
o2 = (a1 & b1) ^ (a2 ^ b2)
o3 = a1 & b1 & (a2 ^ b2)
o4 = a2 & b2

So if he connected o3 and o4 together, he'd have the correct result.

If you're gonna water-cool your CPU... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18035460)

why not have your water cooling tubes do a few extra flops? :)

Eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18035474)

Is it just me or does this not make sense?

When just one input is on the output is 1 - so it's an xor.

Fair enough, but then

when both inputs are on the output is a 1 - so it's an and?

As obviously no water comes out when none goes in we have the following truth table

X Y Out
0 0 0
0 1 1
1 0 1
1 1 1

So it actually functions as an or gate. It can't do two functions at once because it only has one output.

Maybe what he built does work, but his explanation doesn't.

Re:Eh? (1)

jibjibjib (889679) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035556)

It has two outputs.

This has been done before, a long time ago I ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18035486)

saw this same thing reported in Sci Am...like in about 1985.

In later news... (2, Funny)

zdc (1064870) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035492)

"...a young gentlemen from Carnegie Mellon University places water-logic-gate in the microwave to reinvent vaporware."

Obvious security flaws (5, Funny)

dotoole (881696) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035512)

This guy obviously didn't think this through. Any script kiddie with a garden hose could create buffer overflows at will.

Practical applications? (1)

thegreatbob (693104) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035550)

Anyone out there have any practical applications for this? Size would seem to be a problem. Somebody mentioned fluidics. Perhaps he should experiment using gases instead (air computer?). Its still cool; doing logically what several dozen transistors can do.

Questions... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18035574)

I wonder how they handle heat dissipation? Oh wait!
How long until they get to 'sea of gates'?
Does sea moss reduce power dissipation?
Leakage?
Can I debug it using ICE?

Bowdoin Water Adder (4, Interesting)

drDugan (219551) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035610)

My good friend Tim Aron and Josh Rady built a water adder at Bowdoin in 1994, capable of adding 2 8-bit values.

http://academic.bowdoin.edu/computer-science/proje cts/html/wateradder2.shtml [bowdoin.edu]

Re:Bowdoin Water Adder (1)

iamacat (583406) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036230)

I bought one the other day. It was called a measuring cup.

Grammar nazi (1)

bidule (173941) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035616)


First time I hear about eletron. Are those like electron but can support envoronment?

One practical application: (3, Insightful)

kestasjk (933987) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035646)

It would be a very good teaching aid. Even those people in my Hardware Fundamentals course who just "didn't get it" would be able to see clearly what's going on.

Imagine.... (1)

keithmo (453716) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035692)

...if the Greeks had invented this about 2000 years ago.

well.. (1)

spankey51 (804888) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035740)

Don't let Princess Nell anywhere near that thing...

Not a computer (1)

Bitter and Cynical (868116) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035782)

The title of the article is misleading. Correct me if i'm wrong but a computer cannot be created from an AND gate and an XOR gate because neither individually or together form a universal gate. To make an actual computer he would need a [NAND gate] or [a NOR gate] or [an OR gate, AND gate and a NOT (inverter) gate]. I'm not trying to trivialize what this guys done, it's really cool, but to call it a computer is wrong.

Re:Not a computer (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18035982)

Correct me if i'm wrong
with pleasure.. if ( ~(a&b) == ((a&b) ^ 1) ) printf("parent sucks a donkey's dick\n");

AND and XOR alone should be enough (1)

infernow (529374) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036010)

IIRC, you can replicate the behavior of a NOT gate with an XOR gate by setting one of the inputs to constantly on/flowing. From that, you could make NAND gates, which can be used to build any other logic gate.

I don't think an OR gate would be too hard to make either. You'd just need a chamber with two inputs and a drain (and maybe an overflow), and you're set.

Re:Not a computer (1)

Yjerkle (610052) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036052)

AND and NOT alone are enough (because A NAND B = NOT (A AND B) ). Also, A XOR T = NOT A, so just hook one side of the gate straight to the water source, and you've got yourself a NOT gate on the other input, and thus a complete set of operations.

Bull F***ing Shit (-1, Flamebait)

innncomingg (1064000) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035788)

This shows exactly why there has been no real (I mean REAL) innovation in the last 30 years.

Galoshes? (1)

Beryllium Sphere(tm) (193358) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035792)

You'd need some kind of protective footwear.

Never go near the adders without water moccasins.

Yeah but.. (0, Redundant)

yamamushi (903955) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035810)

Does it run linux?

Re:Yeah but.. (1)

lahi (316099) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036366)

Linux is down the drain already!

-Lasse

This looks familiar... (1)

Wizard052 (1003511) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035882)

I remember reading a book called 'The pattern in the stone' whose author was saying that computers can be made from different materials other than electricity, conductors, metals, silicon..etc. It's just a matter of implementing the different logic gates ...Electricity is just the fastest, cleanest and most efficient and reliable way so that whys it's defacto. He also mentioned a water computer. He had infact, even made a whole automated tic-tac-toe computer game out of wood. All this had seemed a bit far-fetched then...

Floating Point Unit??? (4, Funny)

advocate_one (662832) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035948)

does it have one?

Re:Floating Point Unit??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18036218)

It even has a vector unit [howstuffworks.com] .

Two possible outcomes (1)

Nybble's Byte (321886) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035966)

- It brings new meaning to the term 'flow chart'
- If successful this project will open the floodgates for more like it.

Overclock it (1)

Timberwolf0122 (872207) | more than 7 years ago | (#18035986)

by using a liquid with a lower visocity.

This is ancient ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18036026)

I first saw this technology in the 1970s. There is nothing in the least bit new here.

I propose that before posting, stories should be passed in front of a tame CowboyNeal historian, to eliminate presenting the high points of 1800s science as a new concept.

Such people should be over 50 years old, because education was better in those days, and we need well educated eyeballing. Perhaps this should be a requirement for Patent staff as well, because the 50-80 year old bracket are the sanest and most balanced part of the community.

Re:This is ancient ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18036144)

It was called fluidics http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluidics/ [wikipedia.org]

Steam computers (1)

flyingfsck (986395) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036030)

Steam powered logic has been used in explosives factories for process control.

-2 Obvious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18036162)

Imagine a Beowulf cluster. . . . .

(pass the snorkle please I've wet meself)

Steam ... (1)

CSLarsen (961164) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036178)

If they would make logic gates run by steam, then we would have real vapourware!

water computer ! (1)

cyrilc (126593) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036196)

damn^H !!!
This is great stuff

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"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
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