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Intel Gets Go-Ahead For $4 Billion Chip Plant In Ireland

samzenpus posted about 2 years ago | from the if-you-build-it-they-will-come dept.

Intel 104

alancronin writes "Intel has been planning to make its Ireland base one of three global manufacturing sites for its 14nm chips since May last year, and its now been given the okay by Ireland's lead planning agency. The new $4 billion plant will create around 4,300 jobs for the region in Co. Kildare, where Intel already has around 4,000 on staff. The two-year plan involves redeveloping its existing operation, expanding and shifting to make its smaller, more efficient 14nm process. Intel's plans don't stop there, however. It still plans to roll out 10nm products sometime in 2015."

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well, good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42688645)

maybe they'll start paying some real corporate tax then.

Re:well, good. (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42688707)

I'm sure the reason they chose Ireland was because of the tax breaks...

Re:well, good. (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42688751)

absolutely, its ony 12.5% as opposed to the the UK and france where it is in the 20's.

also due to the recession and austerity, ireland is very competitive when it comes to wages.

logical choice.

Re:well, good. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42689351)

That, and Intel isn't forced to transfer the profits declared in their irish subsidiary to the US, where they would be forced to pay taxes.

Re:well, good. (5, Funny)

Sponge Bath (413667) | about 2 years ago | (#42689649)

There is the added expense of leprechaun filters in the clean room.

Re:well, good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42689745)

And much better than the US, where it's 39%.

Re:well, good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42690927)

You are so right. Corporate taxes should be zero! Tax the profits from the people that own it, not the buildings that are owned.

Re:well, good. (1)

Cyberax (705495) | about 2 years ago | (#42693791)

And the people who own the corporations would just receive money through "capital income" tricks. Thus paying next to none in taxes. Pure win!

Re:well, good. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42689897)

When we debated the Irish 12.5% corporation tax in Europe it quickly became apparent that compaines can reduce the headline rate in France down to 8% http://www.finfacts.ie/irishfinancenews/article_1021869.shtml

Also it should be pointed out that companies such as Google move most of their profit through Bermuda so the taxable profits in Ireland are very small even with the low rate.

Re:well, good. (1)

Dcnjoe60 (682885) | about 2 years ago | (#42689923)

absolutely, its ony 12.5% as opposed to the the UK and france where it is in the 20's.

also due to the recession and austerity, ireland is very competitive when it comes to wages.

logical choice.

If that was their reasoning, then this plant would be in Southeast Asia which has lower taxes and much lower wages.

Re:well, good. (3, Insightful)

MBGMorden (803437) | about 2 years ago | (#42690479)

There could be other reasons to avoid that. Granted, I don't think the idea is that prevalent in the technology sector, but in a lot of various areas there's the attitude that anything made in SE Asia (with the exception of Japan) is junk. Doesn't really matter if it actually IS junk or not, but that's the perception.

Take pocket-knives for example. Buck Knives moved some of their lower end production to China a few years back, and despite the Chinese made products actually being pretty decent quality, the community opinion of them ranks a Chinese-made Buck about on the level of a counterfeit.

Western European countries generally don't suffer that bias. They're still known as a location of "craftsman". Like I said I don't think its as much of an issue with electronics, but I certainly do know people who absolutely won't buy something if it says "Made in " China, Taiwan, Vietnam, etc. As I mentioned earlier about the only country around there that's managed to shake that image is Japan, who certainly is known for producing quality stuff.

Re:well, good. (2, Informative)

Frankie70 (803801) | about 2 years ago | (#42690785)

As I mentioned earlier about the only country around there that's managed to shake that image is Japan, who certainly is known for producing quality stuff.

And it took Japan many years to share that image. Both Japanese cars and electronics were considered as cheap crap when they started.

All countries which enter a new industry globally compete first on price. Then they improve quality.

Re:well, good. (1)

wisty (1335733) | about 2 years ago | (#42691241)

Also, there's IP issues. China is pretty keen on their home-grown CPUs. Their MIPS-based processors (with x86 emulation) are 10 years behind what Intel can do, but they are keen to catch up.

Yes I know China's not a monolithic entity, and the Chinese government rarely does more than turn a blind eye on the theft of foreign IP, but still ...

Re:well, good. (1)

chihowa (366380) | about 2 years ago | (#42694643)

It's not an entirely unreasonable view from the perspective of the customer, though. Outsourcing manufacture of a product (to anywhere, but SE Asia is the locale of choice these days) is a cost-cutting move. When a company is deep enough in cost-cutting mode to close up local manufacturing and completely move it out of the country, it wouldn't be surprising if they asked the new manufacturer to decrease the quality, too. Or if they haven't yet asked that, they might shortly do so to further cut costs. Or the new manufacturer might do it by themselves.

The company is trying to make their product more cheaply and they may not have even adjusted their price to account for this.

Outsourcing the manufacture of a product that has always been billed as a "craft" product is basically abandoning the product. It clearly isn't made by "highly trained craftsmen passing along the secret steel recipe" or whatever if a bunch of kids in a Chinese sweatshop can make it. The company is either admitting that there's nothing special about the way they used to make their product, or they've sold out and now sell an inferior knock-off of it.

Re:well, good. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42688755)

It's not "tax breaks", it's the legally required amount of tax.

Re:well, good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42689079)

When compared to other countries it is a tax break.

We live in a global world where the country you are from or where you work/produce is not that relevant any more. So it's normal for companies so go to where they please and have more advantages.

Unfortunately UN is useless and the only world wide laws are against piracy. In tax evasion (legal one) the world doesn't work together to create homogenization and prevent these situations.

I hope Ireland waits a couple of years and then rises the taxes to something near the 20s. So companies will pay plenty more and still doesn't compensate them moving to another place.

Re:well, good. (1)

Dexter Herbivore (1322345) | about 2 years ago | (#42688847)

Not that long ago, Ireland was looking to become the tech capital of Europe by offering an attractive tax regime for tech companies. Looks like the policy is bringing jobs to Ireland once again.

Re:well, good. (4, Insightful)

jimicus (737525) | about 2 years ago | (#42688885)

It comes at a cost - the Irish government is famous for encouraging huge foreign businesses to come in and set up to bring in thousands of jobs at a time at the expense of encouraging any sort of local entrepreneur. As a result, there are quite a few towns where a disproportionate number of jobs depend not just on a specific industry, but on a specific company within that industry.

When that company leaves for even cheaper pastures, the town's in trouble.

Re:well, good. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42688953)

It comes at a cost - the Irish government is famous for encouraging huge foreign businesses to come in and set up to bring in thousands of jobs at a time at the expense of encouraging any sort of local entrepreneur. As a result, there are quite a few towns where a disproportionate number of jobs depend not just on a specific industry, but on a specific company within that industry.

When that company leaves for even cheaper pastures, the town's in trouble.

At least i'ts only a limited number of municipalities, In China the entire national economy depends on this strategy.

Re:well, good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42693119)

Except the enterpreteurs are local and with deep ties with the communist party, so they are no going anywhere.

Re:well, good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42689007)

Arguably Ireland started the strategy because their local entrepreneurs were failures.

Re:well, good. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42689231)

QFT.

Bodies like the NDRC frequently back the wrong horse. The cream of Irish IT industry emigrates to greener pastures for a variety of reasons;

1) Salaries elsewhere like the US are far higher -- I could be earning double what I get here in the US (after currency conversion)
2) The standards of professionalism and skills are higher -- I'm currently working for an Irish software company; There is a severe technical deficit and a propensity towards small world aspirations i.e. "We'll never be big enough to compete with company X, so why bother trying?"
3) The standard of third level education is better -- CS degrees here are a joke.

Re:well, good. (1)

CockMonster (886033) | about 2 years ago | (#42690017)

Speaking as someone who graduation from an Irish University with a CS Degree and MSc, degrees are what you make them.

Re:well, good. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42694413)

And in this case, the degrees made a guy named "CockMonster" whose grammar is a bit perplexing.

Re:well, good. (2)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | about 2 years ago | (#42689267)

What bollocks. Ryanair is one of the better known success stories, but it is far from alone. The problem with Ireland is there's no money and a bizarre distaste in the public sector for local entrepreneurs (ie the self employed can't claim any social support, making starting your own business a seriously risky proposal and not something anyone with dependents should consider), not a lack of local talent.

Re:well, good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42689741)

Personally I don't think successful entrepreneurs require support from the public sector and unemployment benefits.

Re:well, good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42690169)

They don't once successful.

Becoming a success is the trick.

Re:well, good. (1)

edxwelch (600979) | about 2 years ago | (#42689763)

> It comes at a cost - the Irish government is famous for encouraging huge foreign businesses to come in and set up to bring in thousands of jobs at a time at the expense of encouraging any sort of local entrepreneur.

That's right, a local Irish company building state-of-the art 14nm CPU fab facilities would have just sprung into existance, if it weren't for the Irish government favouring Intel.

Re:well, good. (1)

jimicus (737525) | about 2 years ago | (#42689915)

That's right, a local Irish company building state-of-the art 14nm CPU fab facilities would have just sprung into existance, if it weren't for the Irish government favouring Intel.

Obviously not.

But a hundred local Irish companies doing something a lot less state-of-the-art have not sprung into existence. And it's a lot easier for one company to leave the area than it is for a hundred to.

Re:well, good. (2)

LordLimecat (1103839) | about 2 years ago | (#42690959)

Once that plant is in operation, its not going anywhere. It will represent a huge chunk of Intel's assets, and you dont just decide one day youre going to pick up your fab and relocate it to india. These sites cost billions of dollars and take years to build.

Re:well, good. (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 2 years ago | (#42692189)

It comes at a cost - the Irish government is famous for encouraging huge foreign businesses to come in and set up to bring in thousands of jobs at a time at the expense of encouraging any sort of local entrepreneur. As a result, there are quite a few towns where a disproportionate number of jobs depend not just on a specific industry, but on a specific company within that industry.

When that company leaves for even cheaper pastures, the town's in trouble.

Except fabs are somewhat special.

They're expensive - the $4B Intel's spending is on the lower end of the spectrum on how much it costs to open a fab with the latest semiconductor technology these days. And that's just in building and equipping it - it's not like Intel could spend $1B now, then if the business climate is right, upgrade it with $3B more later - all that money has to be spent upfront.

And they have to run 24/7 to make up the return on that cash outlay.

Plus, abandoning a fab is expensive - competitors would love to buy over your old fab and will take all the employees with them.

This isn't like a Google or other internet company that can move at the drop of a hat - this is a serious investment of money, and Intel's likely to continue operations for a LONG time even after the initial technology's obsolete - because starting a new fab is another huge outlay of cash.

Re:well, good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42688919)

Yeah I'd say it's legit when they actually employ people, making something. What remains to be seen is if they'll pull a Google to get out of paying taxes.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_Irish_arrangement [wikipedia.org]

http://arstechnica.com/business/2012/12/google-shifts-a-record-10b-to-bermuda-shell-firm-avoids-billions-in-taxes/ [arstechnica.com]

http://arstechnica.com/business/2012/11/dutch-sandwich-with-a-side-of-tax-relief-may-soon-be-off-googles-menu/ [arstechnica.com]

Re:well, good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42689315)

It's kind of strange how Google is pulled out as the prime example of users of the Double Irish.

The same scheme is used by Apple, Microsoft, Facebook, Oracle, Adobe, and others. My guess is that since both IBM, Intel and Dell has a huge presence in Ireland, they do exactly the same thing.

It's strange how a few years ago, it was IKEA that was in the spotlight for using various tax avoidance strategies, and now everybody is focusing on The G.
http://www.economist.com/node/6919139?story_id=6919139

Not defending any of these companies - the point is purely that this is not a strategy that Google is the first and foremost user of. It's "every bloody multinational, even google".

Re:well, good. (1)

DarenN (411219) | about 2 years ago | (#42691157)

Google also employ thousands of people in Dublin.

Re:well, good. (4, Insightful)

c0lo (1497653) | about 2 years ago | (#42689095)

Wanna bet they'll still shift the profit to Cayman island and the only tax the Irish will collect is the income tax of the employees?

Re:well, good. (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about 2 years ago | (#42689687)

Incredible. Just providing hundreds of jobs is evil, and not thinking that that's better than nothing.

I find it sickening the meme has now spread to the masses that people who actually do things, businesses, are looked at the way Adam and Eve looked at plants in the Garden of Eden -- they only exist at your beknighted sufferance, and may ne plucked at your whim so you can do things.

They're in Ireland because they're fleeing even worse confiscatory self-righteousness elsewhere.

Woe be to this planet with a world government and nowhere to flee.

Re:well, good. (1)

lexa1979 (2020026) | about 2 years ago | (#42689857)

you know who "the masses" are, right ? yes, those who work hard to buy pastas and to have the right to rent their 127.0.0.1.
So, isn't it just normal they speak badly about those poor bastards who just want to have bigger profit's rate ?
Providing hundreds of jobs you say ? I see exploiting other's lifes. (I might be kind of communist here...)

Re:well, good. (1)

MarkRose (820682) | about 2 years ago | (#42689909)

It's not exploitation if people choose to work those jobs, i.e. they consider working the job better than all their other options. It's not just the wage they make: it's a lot easier to work a job than to build a business, and that's why so many choose to work jobs.

Re:well, good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42690475)

Ah, because working a job is better than starving to death, that's not exploitation.

Keep up that willful blindness. It's not that it's easier, it's that they don't have the freedom of action to make the choice. Just like how in the US, I suppose you could say it's easier not to take the risk that your children won't get sick, that you won't get sick, and that trying to start your own business won't leave you unable to pay for that health care.

Yep, keep saying it's a true choice.

Re:well, good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42691067)

You are pointing out the free will decision involved. Consider the man who freely chooses to hand over his money to a gunman. Yes, it is truly free will, but you know there is an unfairness involved.

Re:well, good. (1)

xaxa (988988) | about 2 years ago | (#42689961)

So, who pays for the education of the workers, their healthcare, their food and housing in any times they're not employed, the roads, railways and airports Intel will rely on, etc?

Re:well, good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42690343)

You're a fucking idiot.

Re:well, good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42690859)

The people who actually do things? You mean like the mechanics, teachers, homemakers, sanitation, construction, plumbers, electricians? The ones that make their pittance relative to the people who own stuff.

Re:well, good. (1)

Plasmoid2000ad (1004859) | about 2 years ago | (#42690089)

Well they are producing physical products, so it's a bit more difficult to magic away taxes on real items.

Re:well, good. (3, Interesting)

Dcnjoe60 (682885) | about 2 years ago | (#42689907)

Ireland's tax rate on trading income is 12.5% the average effective corporate tax rate in the US is 27%. However, that 12.5% pays for universal health care for the workers (paying 80% of health care costs). It is far more likely that lower wages AND benefit costs are the deciding factor instead of taxes. Businesses will gladly pay more in taxes if it means they can get rid of a huge cost they have little control over (benefits account for as much as 40% of one's wages and health care is the largest portion of that).

Re:well, good. (1)

slashmydots (2189826) | about 2 years ago | (#42690121)

Well it certainly wasn't because of the mythological creatures in the area. Leprochauns can cause havoc on a large scale in chip-making plants.

Re:well, good. (1)

DaveGod (703167) | about 2 years ago | (#42693589)

Carefully-worded!

Ireland is used by some companies as a tax-dodge because profits can be freely shifted around the EU and Ireland's corporation tax rate is amongst the lowest within the EU (and even friendlier for some specific things like IP). Tax-dodging companies shift profits into Ireland on paper using intangibles, management charges, interest and suchlike. It's typically... difficult to understand... how these profit-shifts relate to economic or commercial reality, especially when the corporate address booking most of the EU profits is a tiny office with a handful of administrative staff while there's massive operations in other countries consistently booking roughly nil profit.

However this Intel move involves actual investment, production and jobs into the country. Profits generated from that are economic and commercial reality. If the low tax rate was a factor then totally fair and valid. I would expect that they also got some other forms of assistance, maybe free lands rents, which is also fair enough if it is within the EU rules.

Re:well, good. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42695509)

so what's wrong with that?

Ireland is competitive in wages, capability, has good infrastructure and low taxes. All the things you would look for when making an investment? Maybe instead of whining we could try to compete (sure - like we would lower our tax rates...).

For some reason, and I wasn't expecting this from slashdot, I see a lot of people thinking there is something wrong with placing your business where you have to pay less taxes. That is a normal, logical and highly rational response.

Re:well, good. (1)

Plasmoid2000ad (1004859) | about 2 years ago | (#42689975)

But they already do... Intel's tax makes up a pretty big chunk of the entire tax take, and it alone is 2%-3% of Ireland's GDP. Oh that right, your just making a snarky ill informed comment and jumping on the tax haven bandwagon.

Good news (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42688741)

I don't care if the reason why they place their facility on Ireland is the low taxes. At least they are giving the Irish people jobs in return, unlike many other corporations. Also, I get to buy cheap processors that were not manufactured in Asia.

Intel doesn't manufacture in Asia much (5, Informative)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | about 2 years ago | (#42689793)

8 of their 11 current fabs are in the USA, one is in Ireland, one is in Israel, one is in China. The Chinese plant doesn't do CPUs, as far as I know, as it is an older process. They do some packaging in Asia, in Singapore if I remember correctly, but you don't tend to see those chips in the US and EU as they have closer packaging plants (in the US you mostly see products from the US packaging plant and their Costa Rica plant).

AMD also isn't Asia focused for CPUs. They have them manufactured at Global Foundries which has a fab in the US, Germany, and Singapore.

Discrete GPUs are all fabbed in Asia these days, specifically in Taiwan by TSMC. Now that may change as TSMC has been badly fucking up they may switch to someone else but for now, all TSMC.

In terms of other stuff, like mobile processors, it can vary highly. For example Samsung is a big player in that market and you might expect Korea to be where they fab. While that's true for flash, for processors it is most in Texas. If you have a phone with a 32nm Samsung processor, Texas ware probably where it was made.

Re:Intel doesn't manufacture in Asia much (1)

Plasmoid2000ad (1004859) | about 2 years ago | (#42690133)

The Singapore packing plant is one of their largest as far as i know. Every chip from Ireland goes there for example. It's probably rarer to see a Singapore packaged chip in the US, but most of the chips in Europe and Asia at least go through there. That's mostly my personal experience, but yeah.

Re:Intel doesn't manufacture in Asia much (1)

Kjella (173770) | about 2 years ago | (#42691111)

AMD also isn't Asia focused for CPUs. They have them manufactured at Global Foundries which has a fab in the US, Germany, and Singapore. Discrete GPUs are all fabbed in Asia these days, specifically in Taiwan by TSMC. Now that may change as TSMC has been badly fucking up they may switch to someone else but for now, all TSMC.

AMD has been paying big bucks to get out of wafer agreements with GloFo, they canceled Krishna and Wichita and started over at TSMC so it's both GPUs and APUs. If TSMC run into trouble the two biggest winners will be Intel and Samsung that have foundries of their own because there's really no good replacement right now.

Re:Intel doesn't manufacture in Asia much (1)

servognome (738846) | about 2 years ago | (#42693013)

Packaging in Asia is done in Malaysia and Vietnam (their largest in terms of footprint). Singapore is a fab that does flash production.

Re:Intel doesn't manufacture in Asia much (1)

DarthVain (724186) | about 2 years ago | (#42695535)

Hmmm...

I recall when I used to do a lot of OC you used to look for batches, and usually it would involve a specific batch of serial numbers and either a Singapore or a Malaysia name on it. I had assumed they were built there. Perhaps that is just where the package is assembled and then stamped... Interesting...

yottascale (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42688761)

3-5 nm stacked chips running at THz speeds. Quantum coprocessing.

Re:yottascale (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42689147)

And all that to enable Twittering that your farts smell like the Indian food you had for lunch. Somehow, I think computers were proportionally more useful when there were only a handful of them, like the CDC6600.

wrong way round (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42688823)

it should read 'ireland gets go ahead on intel job creation'. like intel were ever in danger of being turned down!!

Re:wrong way round (1)

unixisc (2429386) | about 2 years ago | (#42689371)

Precisely! Which country or state was ever going to turn down such an offer?

mod 04 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42688873)

to predict *BSD's guys are usually a need to play most. LLok at the be a lot slower vitality. like an you can. No, a change to The accounting every day...Like IS DYING LIKE THE lizard - In other ass until I hit my who sell another Users of BSD/OS. A Would take about 2 suffering *BSD the next round of else to be an any doubt: FreeBSD officers. Others Has brought upon I have a life to Theo de Raadt, one Locating #GNAA, OUTER SPACE THE infinitesimally [tux.org]? Are you are She had taken officers. Others free-loving climate and personal shower Don't just there are about 700 nearly two years The choosing get tough. I hope obsessed - give goals I personally disgust, or been

Re:mod 04 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42689489)

What an fascinating arguingment.

"go ahead by a lead planning agency" (0)

udachny (2454394) | about 2 years ago | (#42688909)

quotes:

Intel has been planning to make its Ireland base one of three global manufacturing sites for its 14nm chips since May last year, and its now been given the okay by Ireland's lead planning agency.

another quote:

Irelandâ(TM)s lead planning agency An Bord PleanÃla has given chip giant Intel the go-ahead it needs to construct a massive US$4bn chip plant that will produce the next generation of 14 nanometer (nm) microprocessors. The two year-project, if it gets the final go-ahead from Intel's board, has the potential to generate 3,500 construction and 800 full-time technology jobs.

In early 2011, Intel revealed plans to begin a substantial new US$500m construction project at is Leixlip campus in Co Kildare, where it already employs around 4,000 people. The new build, a redevelopment of the former Fab 14 operation at Leixlip, is to develop the next-generation facilities to handle future products.

people just take it for granted that some government agency can prevent a business from opening wherever, and this means prevent an individual (and that's how I see companies, there are individuals behind the fictional corporate front, companies are people) from just buying or leasing private property and running a business there.

While it's Ireland in this case, this pretty much happens everywhere - legalised mafia, racket, protection service, corruption and bribery, that's what this is all about. Bilking individuals out of their money because they dare to want to do business on their own private property.

---

but it's even worse than that, there are people that already made comments to this story saying: good, they'll pay 'real taxes' [slashdot.org] . This is the state of affairs in the minds of the mob today - business? Whatever. Taxes. We want money to be stolen from actual productive people and given to us. That's it, that's the ticket to prosperity. Theft and redistribution.

Re:"go ahead by a lead planning agency" (1)

codeButcher (223668) | about 2 years ago | (#42688925)

I thought it's "lead" as in the element, Pb.

Then again, what do I know about chip manufacture?

They don't use lead anymore (1)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | about 2 years ago | (#42689033)

They never used much, just in solder, but due to RoHS it is all gone now.

Re:They don't use lead anymore (2)

serviscope_minor (664417) | about 2 years ago | (#42689061)

Except where it matters.

I believe that aviation, military and other safety critical grade equipment (medical?) are still permitted to use PbSn 60/40 solder. The SnCu ones aren't well characterised enough and still appear to be slightly too prone to tin whiskers for long term critical use.

Though I don't know if they've done much by the way of soldering inside chips recently anyway.

Re:They don't use lead anymore (1)

servognome (738846) | about 2 years ago | (#42693381)

In flip chip there are hundreds of solder connections between the package and silicon, there are also surface mount components soldered to package.
The switch from SnPb to Pb-free has opened the door to lots of proprietary flavors of solders in the class of Sn + Ag/Cu/In/Sb/Zn + dopant metals

Re:"go ahead by a lead planning agency" (1)

udachny (2454394) | about 2 years ago | (#42689103)

So called "independent", statutory, quazi-judicial body that decides on appeals from planning decisions made by local authorities in Ireland. [wikipedia.org] - One thing I know about 'quazi-government' or 'quazi-judicial' regulatory bodies is that you can easily get rid of the 'quazi' prefix there.

Re:"go ahead by a lead planning agency" (1)

cupantae (1304123) | about 2 years ago | (#42689673)

people just take it for granted that some government agency can prevent a business from opening wherever

How do you know that people take it for granted? Do you live in Ireland? No, it's quite clear that you don't.

All planning permission is obtained through An Bord Pleanála. Anyone can appeal the issue of planning permission or bring to attention the lack thereof. How exactly do you propose that a company like Intel would buy or lease enough private property in Leixlip to create 4,300 jobs without getting permission?

Your comment is rightly scored at -1. While I'm on the subject, I read through the first few "comments worth making" and they are also correctly scored. The irony of you posting this as your sig is that many [slashdot.org] of [slashdot.org] the [slashdot.org] replies [slashdot.org] effectively point out the madness in the original post. Clearly, roman_mir is trying to help people, but is so ill-informed and impervious to reason that he's just posting the same old nonsense over and over again without questioning himself.

Re:"go ahead by a lead planning agency" (1)

Plasmoid2000ad (1004859) | about 2 years ago | (#42689819)

Well... we're talking about a huge manufacturing facility that requires it's own substations and high voltage hookup via a network of pylons. One that needs millions of litres of fresh water. Not to mention the huge car parks for all the workers that permanently alters the run-off of rain, and makes floods much more likely. And that minor detail of the need of transport infrastructure to stop the area around being permanently gridlocked. Yeah... i'm pretty thankful we have a Government agency to make sure all that gets thought of ahead of time and corporations can't just ride in an destroy a country at a whim. If anything i wish they hadn't been so laid back in the past on planning and avoided things like apartments exceeding the water supply for an entire district, business parks miles from the nearest public transport and huge shopping centres right next to motorways turning them into car parks.

Re:"go ahead by a lead planning agency" (1)

Waffle Iron (339739) | about 2 years ago | (#42690885)

We want money to be stolen from actual productive people and given to us. That's it, that's the ticket to prosperity. Theft and redistribution.

Don't be an ignoramus. People have been subject to "theft and redistribution" ever since the occupants of the first settlement of three straw huts decided to enclose it with a common fence. Nobody would be "productive" without taking plenty of advantage of government-supplied services and protection. Corporations are no exception to this.

Taxes are a basic part of the way human society functions, and always have been Deal with it.

The Micks will be disappointed (-1, Troll)

Chrisq (894406) | about 2 years ago | (#42688937)

The Micks will be disappointed when they realise they are not making potato chips

Re:The Micks will be disappointed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42689031)

Ironic that your latest posts include accusing people of being prejudice.

Re:The Micks will be disappointed (1)

Chrisq (894406) | about 2 years ago | (#42689063)

Ironic that your latest posts include accusing people of being prejudice.

A few posts back, but I take the point. This was meant to be light-hearted rather than vicious racism, I'm sorry if it came across wrong. Many of my relatives are Irish - and my wife has Irish ancestry.

Re:The Micks will be disappointed (1)

DiamondGeezer (872237) | about 2 years ago | (#42689073)

It's a terrible idea for a joke. In terms of offensiveness it would be equivalent to referring to an investment in Israel with references to "Hymie" and the Holocaust.

I'm pretty sure you wish you delete that post, but that's the "Internet trap" - you'll never be able to delete it.

For the record, born 2nd Generation English with Irish, Italian and Austrian ancestry.

Re:The Micks will be disappointed (1)

Plasmoid2000ad (1004859) | about 2 years ago | (#42689699)

It's a terrible joke, but it's hardly offensive. It's a well known joke around the Intel plant in Ireland, and occasionally a chat-up line.

Re:The Micks will be disappointed (2)

c0lo (1497653) | about 2 years ago | (#42689119)

The Micks will be disappointed when they realise they are not making potato chips

Even if they'd be potato chips, can you imagine the nutrition level of a 14 nm potato? And if you get to pay $400+ for a "can" of those, would this be a reason for exultation?

Re:The Micks will be disappointed (1)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | about 2 years ago | (#42689275)

What a racist moron.

Re:The Micks will be disappointed (1)

Plasmoid2000ad (1004859) | about 2 years ago | (#42690457)

It's maybe not in good taste, and it's not exactly hilarious but racist?? C'mon. It's a pretty obvious joke, one that get thrown around a lot at Intel.

Re:The Micks will be disappointed (1)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | about 2 years ago | (#42691389)

Oh really? Try this one on for size: "The blacks will be disappointed when they realise they are not making KFC"
All of a sudden it's shocking and racist. And yet the Irish have been subjected to as much if not more horrific slavery (about a third of the country enslaved and sent to Jamaica to work in the plantations, being buried where they dropped in the fields), attempted genocides and deliberate destruction throughout their history than any African nation. At the tail end of which we have Chrisq and his paddy joke. Anyone who thinks that's funny needs their head examined.

Re:The Micks will be disappointed (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 2 years ago | (#42696923)

I assume you're not American.

KFC is shit. YumFoods brand. Awful. KFC is to good chicken; as Taco Bell is to good Mexican, as Arby's is to a good roast beef sandwich, as Pizza Hut is to good pizza. To you notice a pattern? YumFoods brands are uniformly shit. Owned by Japanese who, I assume, don't like American food.

Black folks are sometimes so proud they wont let white people see them eat fried chicken, watermelon or half dozen stereotyped foods. When they do you can bet they know a better place then KFC.

I can make great pan fried chicken. Cheap and easy, the key is timing the breading (10-15 minutes) and owning racks (has to be exposed to air, top and bottom).

Did I mention I love fried chicken. Don't use KFC when you mean 'fried chicken'.

I once was a bored kid, writing a 'login page'. If you used Nigger or any of a list of slurs as a login attempt it said:

Fried watermelon error, stopped in East St.Louis
C:\EStLouis\>

If you used Paddy, Mic, PoagMahone it said:

Dropped Molotov error, server room on fire, admin drunk.

I had an extensive case statement. At the time I was paid for shit and was making sure they got fair value.

At this point in my day, (posting rambling shit on /.) I should quit pretending and go home.

TPTB HUNGRY and LUSTING to CHIP YOUR ASS! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42688969)

"Everything we see has some hidden message. A lot of awful messages are coming in under the radar - subliminal consumer messages, all kinds of politically incorrect messages..." - Harold Ramis

"RFID in School Shirts must be trial run"

The trial runs began a LONG time ago!

We're way past that process.

Now we're in the portion of the game where they will try and BRAINWASH us into accepting these things because not everyone BROADCASTS themselves on and offline, so RFID tracking will NEED to be EVERYWHERE, eventually.

RFID is employed in MANY areas of society. RFID is used to TRACK their livestock (humans) in:

* 1. A lot of BANK's ATM & DEBIT cards (easily cloned and tracked)
* 2. Subway, rail, bus, other mass transit passes (all of your daily
activities, where you go, are being recorded in many ways)
* 3. A lot of RETAIL stores' goods
* 4. Corporate slaves (in badges, tags, etc)

and many more ways!

Search the web about RFID and look at the pictures of various RFID devices, they're not all the same in form or function! When you see how tiny some of them are, you'll be amazed! Search for GPS tracking and devices, too along with the more obscured:

- FM Fingerprinting &
- Writeprint
- Stylometry

tracking methods! Let's not forget the LIQUIDS at their disposal which can be sprayed on you and/or your devices/clothing and TRACKED, similar to STASI methods of tracking their livestock (humans).

Visit David Icke's and Prison Planet's discussion forums and VC's discussion forums and READ the threads about RFID and electronic tagging, PARTICIPATE in discussions. SHARE what you know with others!

These TRACKING technologies, on and off the net are being THROWN at us by the MEDIA, just as cigarettes and alcohol have and continue to be, though the former less than they used to. The effort to get you to join FACEBOOK and TWITTER, for example, is EVERYWHERE.

Maybe, you think, you'll join FACEBOOK or TWITTER with an innocent reason, in part perhaps because your family, friends, business parters, college ties want or need you. Then it'll start with one photo of yourself or you in a group, then another, then another, and pretty soon you are telling STRANGERS as far away as NIGERIA with scammers reading and archiving your PERSONAL LIFE and many of these CRIMINALS have the MEANS and MOTIVES to use it how they please.

One family was astonished to discover a photo of theirs was being used in an ADVERTISEMENT (on one of those BILLBOARDS you pass by on the road) in ANOTHER COUNTRY! There are other stories. I've witnessed people posting their photo in social networking sites, only to have others who dis/like them COPY the photo and use it for THEIR photo! It's a complete mess.

The whole GAME stretches much farther than the simple RFID device(s), but how far are you willing to READ about these types of instrusive technologies? If you've heard, Wikileaks exposed corporations selling SPYWARE in software and hardware form to GOVERNMENTS!

You have to wonder, "Will my anti-malware program actually DISCOVER government controlled malware? Or has it been WHITELISTED? or obscured to the point where it cannot be detected? Does it carve a nest for itself in your hardware devices' FIRMWARE, what about your BIOS?

Has your graphics card been poisoned, too?" No anti virus programs scan your FIRMWARE on your devices, especially not your ROUTERS which often contain commercially rubber stamped approval of BACKDOORS for certain organizations which hackers may be exploiting right now! Search on the web for CISCO routers and BACKDOORS. That is one of many examples.

Some struggle for privacy, some argue about it, some take preventitive measures, but those who are wise know:

Privacy is DEAD. You've just never seen the tombstone.

Re:TPTB HUNGRY and LUSTING to CHIP YOUR ASS! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42689091)

You forgot the worst, most dastardly device at their disposal. Cookies! Use Ghostery and BetterPrivacy. Wearing a tinfoil hat won't hurt either.

Remember Dell (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42689133)

In Limerick region.
Took the subventions (massive roads, airport upgrades etc.).
Left when subventions ended (as does Ryanair in continental Europe as well...)
Today this region is a desert...

Re:Remember Dell (1)

Plasmoid2000ad (1004859) | about 2 years ago | (#42689735)

There's a bit of a difference between Dell and Intel in terms of the skill level of the jobs, and the R&D portion involved. I don't reckon Intel would have as much to gain chasing subsidies and throwing away their highly skilled personnel.

Re:Remember Dell (1)

DarenN (411219) | about 2 years ago | (#42691235)

Desert is the last word you'd use to describe Limerick. It rains here all the damn time!

Article(s) didn't state a reason? (1)

Pros_n_Cons (535669) | about 2 years ago | (#42689243)

I didn't notice a reason in either article about why they decided to _create_ 4k jobs overseas, and spend 4 billion to do it. I'm sure those across the pond will assume its cause we're fat, stupid and lazy, well.. yes, but seems places like Ireland and Oregon are tax friendly too? I wonder how much of this we can expect with the tax the rich mentality we've recently adopted.

Here in California its already shown us what happens. They increased tax yet revenue tanked (the rich are simply moving and taking money with them). I really hope the reason to continue a hostile business environment is because we're stupid. Thats much better than the alternatives like we knowingly vote to take others money so more of us can do less. I'm not sure what fair share means exactly, but when 30,000 out of 38 million Californians pay 25% of the taxes and over 50% pay 0% at all using the word "fair" isn't the F word that comes to mind.

Re:Article(s) didn't state a reason? (2)

IRWolfie- (1148617) | about 2 years ago | (#42689717)

Ireland doesn't have particularly low tax on rich people. We have a low corporate tax, but that isn't the same thing.

Re:Article(s) didn't state a reason? (1)

Plasmoid2000ad (1004859) | about 2 years ago | (#42690171)

They need a reason to create jobs anywhere in the world other then the US? That seems like a very small minded view of the world where the US is number 1, and everyone has an obligation to give it some special priority.

Re:Article(s) didn't state a reason? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42690205)

Yours is a recently very unpopular view, that I share. The mob mentality is taking over the U.S. and the growing "war on wealth" is going to be a huge problem for the nation and the economy. The cows will come home to roost very soon.

Prepare to be modded as a troll. Our opinion, though based in fact, is extremely unpopular.

Re:Article(s) didn't state a reason? (1)

unixisc (2429386) | about 2 years ago | (#42692083)

I happen to agree w/ you, but in this case, Intel's first 2 plants were already in OR and AZ. It makes sense to diversify, so that if the business environment in one country causes a cost increase, they have alternatives in other countries to try and offset it. As it is, Intel has fabs in US, Israel and Ireland, and w/ their tech, it makes sense to spread it out, so that there is minimal impact on their production if anything happens at a plant.

Re:Article(s) didn't state a reason? (1)

unixisc (2429386) | about 2 years ago | (#42692031)

This Irish plant was the third - the other 2 were in OR and AZ

Folks, deal with it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42689415)

It's just a matter of time until there's a light saber scene between Darth Vader and Captain Kirk.

Re:Folks, deal with it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42689709)

Kirk would win. In this thread or the other one. Always. He doesn't even need the light saber; double fists to the back work just fine in both universii.

"Made in Ireland" (1)

droptop (558616) | about 2 years ago | (#42690779)

I remember quite a bit of my software and some hardware coming from Ireland in the late eighties an early nineties. I still have my old Apple PowerBook 170 that was made in Ireland. Good on 'em!

Re:"Made in Ireland" (1)

DarenN (411219) | about 2 years ago | (#42691279)

Apple still have huge facilities in Cork. Until Dell left they were the EMEA maufacturing facility. Intel, IBM, Google and Facebook all employ thousands of people around Dublin. If Ireland had any kind of venture capital markets...

Re:"Made in Ireland" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42696051)

yet there isn't even an apple store in the country. the closest one is in belfast

Real reason they did this, (1)

TheSkepticalOptimist (898384) | about 2 years ago | (#42691733)

Intel wants more horse meat in their products.

Re:Real reason they did this, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42695105)

Ireland != UK, stop horsing around.

Chip plant? Well it makes sense... (1)

CCarrot (1562079) | about 2 years ago | (#42692241)

...after all, that's a good local supply of potatoes they got there.

Wonder what flavours they'll be making? Classics like Barbeque and Salt and Vinegar, or will they be targeting the specialty flavour markets, like Sauerkraut Surprise? (Surprise...it's sauerkraut flavoured!)

Meh...please excuse my Friday silliness... ;o)

4300 jobs!!! (1)

Heebie (1163973) | about 2 years ago | (#42697369)

That's about 1% of the unemployed people here in Ireland in one fell swoop. This is a big win for the Irish economy! :) Many of those people will need training, and the knock-on effects will be massive! It's also jobs for folks who are outside of Dublin. That plant is out in Leixlip.
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