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Project Seeks To Build Inexpensive 9-inch Monitor For Raspberry Pi

timothy posted about 10 months ago | from the some-assembly-required dept.

Displays 176

angry tapir writes "A Kickstarter project is aiming to bring an inexpensive 9-inch portable monitor to the popular US$25 Raspberry Pi PC, which comes without a keyboard, mouse or monitor. The "HDMIPi" will include an LCD panel that will show images at a resolution of 1280 x 800 pixels. Computers can be hooked up to the monitor via an HDMI controller board that can be wired to the LCD. The display is being made by Raspi.TV and Cyntech."

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Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based computer. (0, Flamebait)

Animats (122034) | about 10 months ago | (#45322669)

So they're going to build a ARM-based desktop computer. Sort of like a netbook in worse packaging. Why?

If you want a basic 9 inch ARM tablet, buy one. They're really cheap. You can get one on Amazon for about $72. [amazon.com] Dump Android and load up Linux if you like.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (3, Informative)

Crudely_Indecent (739699) | about 10 months ago | (#45322715)

No, they're going to build an HDMI touchscreen with the Pi in mind. It's not a computer - it's just a screen.

Unfortunately - it isn't the Pi screen everyone wants. The thing people are screaming for is the one the Pi folks have promised us - the DSI screen.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (4, Insightful)

citizenr (871508) | about 10 months ago | (#45322921)

Unfortunately - it isn't the Pi screen everyone wants. The thing people are screaming for is the one the Pi folks have promised us - the DSI screen.

we dont even need DSI screen, just DSI driver

just like we need UNIVERSAL CSI driver, not that binary blob garbage locked to one module crap they ship with camera.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45322751)

i just want to understand how do americans get so fat? cant you see you're gaining weight and eat less calories or something before it gets that bad? why can I do that and so many americans can't? where is the failure happening? profile it like software and tell me how a simple observation becomes so hard to do that so many fail to do it. that's as polite as i know how to ask it. i really do want to know.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45322791)

i just want to understand how do americans get so fat?

Hunger & Games.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45322897)

Ever watch CNN International? The difference between CNN and CNNI is that CNNI has lots and lots of fat people. CNN has none of that. Fat people in Hong Kong? Yup. On cable. Fat on cable. Whodathunk. Fat people in Adu Dhabi? Yup. Fat on cable. Whodathunk. And then there is France. Fat on cable - yup! - but hairy on cable too. On cable. Who the HELL do they think they are putting fat people on cable? I am glad there is no smellTV. I would hate to have to smell Europeans - on cable.

See bathing is a once a week thing in Europe.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (4, Interesting)

glitch0 (859137) | about 10 months ago | (#45322763)

You clearly don't understand the purpose of the Raspberry Pi. Nobody is replacing their computer with this, it's for making projects and experimenting and learning to program. A 9-inch monitor would use useful in many scenarios.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45322841)

I never got that "learning to program" excuse. Just install Python on whatever computer you're using right now. Why do you need a separate piece of hardware that doesn't even have a screen??

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45322899)

Real Programmers don't eat Quiche or use Python.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45322977)

Can't really compare python to real programming. Python is for babies, real men program so close to hardware they can feel the pin states switching and sense the memory locations.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45323327)

Hardware dudes doesn't feel the pin states switch, they causes them by just waving their hand over the board.

That usually means that you have to add a capacitor somewhere.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (2)

TeknoHog (164938) | about 10 months ago | (#45323733)

real men program so close to hardware

Pfft. Real Men are hardware.

Re: Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based compu (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45323865)

Men are not the only people who program.

Re: Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based compu (2)

Hognoxious (631665) | about 10 months ago | (#45323993)

Are we not men (who program)?

We are Dev(el)o(pers)!

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (3, Insightful)

mlk (18543) | about 10 months ago | (#45323619)

Two reasons:
1) I can super glue it into a home-made device of some sort and not have two worry about cost.

2) You can give it to your kids and keep a SD image ready and you no need to worry about them going "what happens when I do "sudo rm -rf /".

Both are not about just programming. They are about understand complete systems. You don't need to use a Pi, but they are cheap and fairly well supported.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45323759)

...and you no need to worry about them going "what happens when I do "sudo rm -rf /".

Either don't give them root access, or use it as a learning experience where they can learn not to run commands they don't understand, how to re-install an OS and the value of backing up any data they had on that computer.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45324405)

Either don't give them root access, or use it as a learning experience where they can learn not to run commands they don't understand

Learning experiences are all about doing things you don't understand. Or at least, don't fully understand yet. Don't teach them not to try new things, teach them to know when they're taking risks and to plan for what they'll do when things go wrong.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (1)

rjstanford (69735) | about 10 months ago | (#45324061)

Which defeats the silly monitor they're talking about - at a best case "goal" price of US$100 (already 2/3 of the cost of existing retail solutions quoted in the article), its not a throwaway piece.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (0)

Joce640k (829181) | about 10 months ago | (#45323863)

I never got that "learning to program" excuse. Just install Python on whatever computer you're using right now. Why do you need a separate piece of hardware that doesn't even have a screen??

Yep, that's about the response I'd expect from a Python programmer.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (4, Insightful)

msobkow (48369) | about 10 months ago | (#45323403)

Clearly you've never programmed bare metal as we did in the days of the Commodore 64, TRS-80, Apple II, Commodore PET, etc.

It was *fun* back then. There wasn't even a debounced keyboard driver for most of those machines. You had to map the bits of the IO ports to individual keys. :)

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45323473)

This days, you can _really_ program the bare metal. You can get an FPGA board with chip capable of holding an AVR core and a plenty of left-over logic blocks for $80-100.

Just drivers? You could actually write yourself a C64 or an Apple ][ in Verilog/VHDL now!

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45323625)

You can also use the popular Raspberry Pi platform and get access to a large community of enthusiasts who understand the platform in a fairly deep level.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45323769)

Just drivers? You could actually write yourself a C64 or an Apple ][ in Verilog/VHDL now!

In theory. The free versions of the development tools are pretty bloated and horrible and nothing that will keep the interest of a teenager.

For building computers with logic gates Minecraft might be more accessible than FPGAs.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (3)

Joce640k (829181) | about 10 months ago | (#45323869)

Clearly you've never programmed bare metal as we did in the days of the Commodore 64, TRS-80, Apple II, Commodore PET, etc.

It was *fun* back then. There wasn't even a debounced keyboard driver for most of those machines. You had to map the bits of the IO ports to individual keys. :)

These days we use Arduinos. Try writing a software TV output or SID chip emulator on one...

A Raspberry Pi is a bit too much like having a real computer.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 10 months ago | (#45323953)

You clearly don't understand cost analysis. A cheap tablet plus an Arduino or similar attached to it provides all of that without an additional computer since you can install a more full-fledged Linux on some of them, or you can install more Linuxy bits in a chroot and use that to run even the IDE.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (5, Insightful)

dido (9125) | about 10 months ago | (#45322785)

How many GPIO pins does your ARM tablet have by the way? I sometimes wire wrap discrete components and sensors and stuff to the ones on my Raspberry Pi and write software to drive them.

The Raspberry Pi isn't just a cheap ARM-based PC. An important part of its vision is to bring back the spirit of hacking, both software and hardware, that used to be possible in the old computers of the 1980s. This has become very difficult to do on modern x86 PCs, and is all but impossible on mobile devices. The people who bash the Pi these days tend to forget that part for some reason.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45322883)

Define "spirit of hacking".

On x86/x64, I've got whole arsenal of programming tools on my fingertips, from simpler like Scratch and then all the way through simple, but rather powerful like Processing or LOVE up to (down to?) C, assemblers and HDLs. I can play around with pretty pictures and 2D physics, or write my own kernel, test it in a VM and boot it on my actual machine, I can also experience, for example, assembler for Motorola 68K in Amiga emulator or for Knuth's MMIX.

With Android, though you'll need a PC for most of development, you're still just one download away from writing your own programs, whether it's in Java, Lua, Javascript or ActionScript.

The only real difference from RasPi I see is it's too easy to get distracted by things already done on x86/Win or ARM/Android.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (4, Interesting)

Fjandr (66656) | about 10 months ago | (#45322919)

There are tons of hardware add-ons to the Pi that are simply not possible with a PC (and difficult with most tablets).

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45322941)

Yes but we've had microcontrollers for decades already.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45322981)

Might be, but what they have to do with spirit of hacking?

I say, just realizing that instead of clicking buttons you can automate your everyday tasks, may be even simply with shell scripts, is already in the spirit of hacking, as well as the next step of realizing you can extend them to do much more interesting things than simply replacing a human clicking on buttons.

Why do you need GPIO to feel that spirit?

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45323077)

There are tons of hardware add-ons to the Pi that are simply not possible with a PC (and difficult with most tablets).

And what are some of these 'tons of hardware add-ons' that are not possible with a PC?

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (2)

anubi (640541) | about 10 months ago | (#45323415)

Do not forget that there are still lots of ways to get all the parallel I/O pins you want on a tablet... run a USB link to an Arduino.

No sense much trying to do a lot of numerical heavy lifting with an Arduino. It simply does not have the horsepower or memory for it. It can act as an intermediary between a tablet which has all sorts of horsepower, and a platform controlling motors and reading sensors.

If the application is quite menial ( say datalogging ), an Arduino can handle it quite nicely on its own when coupled with appropriate storage blocks - but in and of itself, just maintaining a FAT filesystem alone would be difficult for an Arduino, yet a piece of cake for a Raspberry Pi.

I am presently building with an Arduino platform and note I am taking a significant amount of its resources just to deal with two rotary quadrature encoders and two LCD displays.

I am aiming for absolute simplicity. I need lots of low speed I/O and bit-banging special protocols more than anything else ( and I can get it via Arduino's I2C bus ). I will continue with this, but if there is any significant numerical analysis or display, its going to have to partner with something else to do the heavy stuff.

As it is, I intend to use a Parallax Propeller chip if I exceed Arduino's capacity, as most of my needs are menial bit-banging protocols to interface old technologies to newer stuff - and I want it all done in parallel so I do not have interrupt, timing and latency issues. The Propeller chip has eight cores, running in parallel, so each core can be tasked with an individual menial thingie ( UART, SPI, I2C, video, audio, DMX lighting, whatever ), and they will run in parallel without contention or timing issues from waiting for the program counter to be handed to them.

Andre LaMothe has developed a "Chameleon" board combining an Arduino with a Propeller chip if you want to explore this avenue. [xgamestation.com]

A Raspberry Pi would do everything. But then, sometimes a hand calculator comes in handy when you don't want to launch a fullbore compiler to evaluate some mathematical thingie you dream up.

I see a Raspberry Pi ideal for those places you would normally put a full-fledged tablet in... say an interactive kiosk with full display and TCP/IP networking. It has the horsepower to do darned near anything. And lots of hardware I/O as a bonus, where the Arduino solution involves channeling everything from the tablet through the USB bus or network link ( YellowJacket, DiamondBack, or similarly equipped Arduino ).

I guess one of the things I would like to see most is some sort of interface which would adapt to any LCD display out there and let me drive it with the Raspberry Pi output, as there always seems to be some defunct LCD display somewhere that I could repurpose.

Maybe something down the lines of this [aliexpress.com]

Like what? (1)

thegarbz (1787294) | about 10 months ago | (#45323281)

I have devices here that I bought from run of the mill hacking websites that speak SPI, I2C, TWI, UART, and can be scripted and bitbanged to communicate in any protocol I so choose. They also offer basic ADC, and PWM. Hell one of the little adapters I have even speaks natively to HD44780 based LCDs.

What can you do on the RaspberyPi which you can't do with the appropriate card on an actual PC?

Re:Like what? (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about 10 months ago | (#45323623)

What can you do on the RaspberyPi which you can't do with the appropriate card on an actual PC?

Put it in your pocket.

Say "yeah, whatever" if it gets broken or taffed.

Re:Like what? (1)

jeffb (2.718) (1189693) | about 10 months ago | (#45324151)

"Taffed"?

I don't usually raise my hand to ask for a definition, but when Google and Urban Dictionary say they've never heard of it, I figure I've done my due diligence.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (3, Insightful)

dido (9125) | about 10 months ago | (#45323019)

Your definition of hacking sounds like all software to me. I mentioned software and hardware. There isn't even a plain RS-232 serial or Centronics/IEEE-1284 parallel port on most modern PCs any more, which were the easiest ways to do hardware interfacing back in the day, and you'll be lucky to even have a host USB port on most mobile devices. USB can be used to do hardware interfacing, but it is in no way as trivial as serial or parallel port interfacing used to be. You could actually wire TTL-level logic straight to a parallel port, and you can wire the same stuff to the Raspberry Pi's GPIO pins with just a pull-down resistor (or you could use 3.3v CMOS logic instead).

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45323057)

Even if there are no built-in RS-232 or parallel ports on the motherboard, there is plenty of interesting devices to plug into USB, including RS-232 adapters or, as mentioned in other comment here, GPIO modules.

So, with GPIO adapter at ~$15-20, it seems RasPi is for those who has no other computers in the house, but I still don't get what it has to do with spirit of the hacking by itself.

Re: Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based compu (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45323101)

You're an idiot

Re: Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based compu (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45323563)

You're an idiot

Thank you for this elaborate, well thought-out argument. It clearly demonstrates your superior analysis of the topic. Deep insights like this are what make Slashdot worth reading.

I just wonder why you refer to yourself in the second person.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45323125)

Think of yourself as a ten-year old kid who has a fascination with computers and stuff, the way I was thirty years ago when I got my first computer. How would you get into hardware hacking? Gee, I'll ask my parents to buy me that $20 GPIO adapter and get them to let me plug it and my soldered electronics into a PC. And if I screw up, as I'm bound to do eventually, I could conceivably damage my $500+ PC, and good luck getting my parents to get that fixed or replaced any time soon. I blow away a $35 Raspberry Pi, nowhere near as painful.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (1)

MouseTheLuckyDog (2752443) | about 10 months ago | (#45323255)

Yes that would be my argument too, but why not an arduino?

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (1)

CurryCamel (2265886) | about 10 months ago | (#45323301)

Because arduino does not run python.
And so we come a full circle, just like the Ouroboros.

The R-Pi is a nice and cheap devboard from Broadcom, don't get me wrong. But somehow ... all the hype about "school children that cannot program" has a false taste about it. Guess I sound like one of the Yorkshiremen, but I prefer my microcontrollers being programmable in assembly, and delivered in DIPs.
 

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (5, Informative)

Calinous (985536) | about 10 months ago | (#45323317)

Arduino is very "light-duty" - this summer's best Arduino board had an 32-bit ARM processor at some 80 MHz, with 512 kB of flash and 96KB of RAM.
Meanwhile, the Raspberry PI runs at about 1GHz, has 512 MB of RAM.
Meanwhile, an x86 (64 bits) processor runs 4 or more cores at 3+ GHz and can access 16+ GB of RAM.
      None of it is "better" than the other, they're just optimal for different tasks - Arduino for easy hardware work, prototyping and very low power, Raspberry PI for more processing power at a low price, and so on. Just like some people need a semi and some need an ultracompact car

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (2)

jeffb (2.718) (1189693) | about 10 months ago | (#45324175)

Yep, some people need a semi, some need an ultra-compact car -- and some need a minivan. And, just like Raspberry Pi users, the minivan drivers will catch a lot of grief from people whose self-image is somehow wrapped up in hardware choices.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45323305)

One problem going via USB: It's less predictable, timingwise, for near-real time applications than the old RS-232 driver. Example: Controlling a PCB mill.

also: The 9 inch touchscreen would be sweet, if you want to build embedded devices where you need to display readable graphs and data as well as integrating a touch screen interface. At a £75 price point, it still beats using an android tablet and a GPIO breakout kit. Also, I hear the Pi has mounting screw holes now? A tablet doesn't.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (1)

TheSeatOfMyPants (2645007) | about 10 months ago | (#45323253)

The original spirit of hacking was finding ways to make hardware do things far beyond what its creators intended or even realized was possible -- pushing it to its limits -- either by altering the hardware itself (like by soldering new connections), or by reprogramming the firmware. It takes a great deal of raw creativity of the sort that the vast majority of adults lose before adulthood, from what Ican tell, and for experienced hacking, highly detailed knowledge of the hardware.

The software-focused activities you describe use a different, more guided form of creativity that builds on existing creations or concepts. (The potential exception: "playing with pretty pictures" if they'refrom scratch or a new way of combining existing elements.) Within those endeavors, you're not likely to do the technological equivalent to a kid (or artist) painting the sky lime green just to see how it will affect the way the classic-green grass looks -- but the tech-equivalent might be exact what you'd try if you were cobbling together pieces from a few failed hardware projects to see if you could make a robot that can detect salinity levels in tears.

Hopefully real hardware hackers can pitch in and come up with a better explanation than this. :-p

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (1)

Salafrance Underhill (2947653) | about 10 months ago | (#45323339)

The Pi is cheap to the extent that you can throw a bunch of them at specialised applications and use them in environments where you wouldn't risk other options. It's cheap to the extent that you can play around with electronics, without agonising about the cost of doing something stupid. It's low-powered - you can run one on AA batteries making all sorts of mobile applications practical (the avionics for a drone, for example). You can give them to your kids to do with as they please.

For the form factor, they are *powerful* little beasts, making them extremely flexible. Try running python and gpu-intensive code on a pic controller.

Of course, your imagination *does* limit what you can do with them.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (2, Informative)

evilviper (135110) | about 10 months ago | (#45322965)

How many GPIO pins does your ARM tablet have by the way?

Just as many as you plug-in to the USB port...

http://numato.com/8-channel-usb-gpio-module [numato.com]

The Raspberry Pi isn't just a cheap ARM-based PC.

You're right, it isn't that cheap, gets expensive fast, and even then makes a lousy PC.

An important part of its vision is to bring back the spirit of hacking, both software and hardware, that used to be possible in the old computers of the 1980s.

Software hacking can be done on any system, and equipment with higher performance and open drivers are better platforms. The only reason the RPI brought back hardware hacking was because it was misdesigned, so everybody ends up swapping USB port resistors. Other than that... You can learn a lot more about hardware with a full-fledged PC, with swapable CPUs, memory, video, etc.

A few GPIO pins is ALL you can point to, and you can get BETTER I/O hardware, CHEAPER for a PC, or just buying a less expenive Arduino.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45323035)

Cheaper? The price I see is $19.95 for that GPIO USB interface. For just $15 more I can have a Model B Raspberry Pi that already has several GPIO pins by default. The trouble with modern PCs is that they're complicated beasts, and it is extremely difficult to get down to the bare hardware without getting swamped in a morass of details that requires an inordinate amount of study just to get started, which basically kills it.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (2)

evilviper (135110) | about 10 months ago | (#45323053)

For just $15 more I can have a Model B Raspberry Pi that already has several GPIO pins by default

Only if you don't want a monitor with it.

Gee... what's the topic of this story and thread, again?

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (0)

Pav (4298) | about 10 months ago | (#45323083)

Power requirements, form factor, price, weight... an ARM tablet, PC etc... just can't do the job. Stop pretending otherwise.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (1)

evilviper (135110) | about 10 months ago | (#45323557)

Power requirements, form factor, price, weight... an ARM tablet, PC etc... just can't do the job. Stop pretending otherwise.

Everything I've seen indicates an ARM tablet is the cheaper, smaller, lighter, lower-power option once you factor in a screen.

If you've got anything to offer, other than baseless assertions, let's hear it.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (0)

Pav (4298) | about 10 months ago | (#45323645)

*sigh* you really have not done any hardware hacking have you. Hacking requires flexibility - with a Pi you have a screen, or not. You could argue a PC isn't efficient for the same reason - you could have a game console, a tablet and an android netbook for the price of a decent workstation, and many people go that way, and it's not a bad thng. Generally hackers go with the more flexible kit though because it'll serve them for the tasks they haven't thought up yet.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (4, Insightful)

rdnetto (955205) | about 10 months ago | (#45323105)

A port expander is *not* the same thing as GPIOs - it means you incur the delays associated with doing things over USB/I2C/etc. Maybe that's ok if all you want to do is flash some LEDs or turn on a relay, but for timing constrained applications, that's not feasible.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45323135)

If you're a ten year old kid like some of us were in the 1980s, do you think it'll feel like a good idea plugging in one of those GPIO things into your PC hooked up to hardware you soldered up together? If you screw up you could conceivably damage or destroy your PC, and your parents are going to kill you as it cost them $500+ to get that thing for you. On the other hand, with a $35 Raspberry Pi, that's in the range of something a kid these days can actually save up for from their allowance, and if they screw up and destroy it, que sera, sera. Might hurt a little, but not on the same level as damaging a PC that costs several hundred dollars.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (0)

evilviper (135110) | about 10 months ago | (#45323583)

On the other hand, with a $35 Raspberry Pi, that's in the range of something a kid these days can actually save up for from their allowance, and if they screw up and destroy it, que sera, sera.

The Pi is only $35 for the bare-bones (actually $40 on Amazon). Throw in power supply, case, SD card, etc., and the price more than doubles. You can absolutely pick up a complete PC, off-lease or refurbished, for less money.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (4, Informative)

dido (9125) | about 10 months ago | (#45324105)

Nonsense. For the other stuff you need to buy, a case is the only one that has to be custom made, but I bought mine for only about $8 from RS as I recall. Most modern mobile phones have MicroUSB chargers that can readily be used with the RPi. The official power supply from RS was $15 when I bought it, and now I wish I hadn't, because mobile phone chargers that can produce 5V/2A DC can be had for less than $5. And who the hell doesn't have tons of old SD cards lying around? I have dozens of old 2GB-4GB cards lying around, gathering dust, left over from old digital cameras and such. In any case I can buy a new 4GB card for approximately $5 (or an 8GB for $8), and that's more than enough space to install Raspbian. Total bill thus comes up to $35 + $8 + $5 + $5 = $53.

Now, I see that you can probably buy a refurbished 300 MHz Pentium II-based PC (which is how powerful the Raspberry Pi's processor is said to be on their FAQ) for $60-$70 or so, but it would have only 64-128 megs RAM (good luck finding more RAM compatible with it), and probably an old IDE hard drive that is smaller than the $5 SD card (sorry, SATA didn't exist when that machine was manufactured), and no or very primitive 2D/3D acceleration (no luck doing H.264 decoding on such hardware, so it can't even run XBMC), and it consumes ten times more power. So you just spent $20 more for a machine inferior in almost every way to the Raspberry Pi. Good call.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (4, Interesting)

jareth-0205 (525594) | about 10 months ago | (#45323085)

Agreed. The other thing that people seem to choose to ignore is the value in a standadised platform and a helpful community around that. All the things the RPi does is possible by other means, of course, but what happens when you're starting out and don't know what you're doing? There's a big community around the RPi, magazines, tutorials, forums, all people who know what hardware you have and can answer your questions directly.

I'm a programmer by trade, but I know very little about analogue electronics. RPi community means I can get out into building physical things, which would be far harder if someone just threw a USB GPIO board at me with no extra help.

Spirit of hacking (1)

petes_PoV (912422) | about 10 months ago | (#45323091)

bring back the spirit of hacking, both software and hardware

And for that the Pi is a failure. It needs an O/S, which makes it difficult as an entry level and it can't even do analog inputs on its own.

The spirit of hacking was alive and as well as could be expected with the Aeduino, before the Pi came along - and it will be just as healthy after the Pi metamorphoses into an overpriced and underpowered LEGO-brick style tablet that doesn't work properly.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (1)

exomondo (1725132) | about 10 months ago | (#45323103)

How many GPIO pins does your ARM tablet have by the way?

Just plug something like this [wordpress.com] into your tablet.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (2)

niftydude (1745144) | about 10 months ago | (#45323183)

How many GPIO pins does your ARM tablet have by the way?

Just plug something like this [wordpress.com] into your tablet.

You know that open usb io board is twice the cost of a raspberry pi, right?

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (1)

exomondo (1725132) | about 10 months ago | (#45323433)

Yeah, I'm fairly sure it's not the only one around either. I can't imagine that price point is a particularly high barrier to entry, easier than getting yourself a raspberry pi and £75 screen. Either way there are plenty of ways to get into hardware hacking outside of raspberry pi and a usb GPIO board for your PC, laptop or tablet is a pretty accessible one.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about 10 months ago | (#45323115)

afaik nobody is using the gpio pins well enough to run steppers etc directly off it.

buying a tablet and arduino+usb-otg shield isn't too bad(clones! the official boards are horribly expensive). some official google sw for it too..

but the learn to program excuse is.. well it's an excuse. I've yet to learn anyone having bought and used one to learn to program, I know several who bought it to run their home automations etc - but they all knew how to program beforehand anyways.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45323167)

Whoever said that it was just about learning to program? Learning to program is easy. You can do it on literally any PC, with only a web browser and a JavaScript tutorial website. Embedded systems interfacing is much harder to learn on the PC these days thanks primarily to how complicated the hardware has become.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (1)

csumpi (2258986) | about 10 months ago | (#45324141)

You can do the same, and much more more through AOA [android.com] . And you get a touchscreen, a battery, bluetooth, a working USB port, a case et al.

and is all but impossible on mobile devices

Now you are just spreading FUD. LMGTFY [lmgtfy.com]

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45322913)

That does not even list a resolution. Also, its a tablet not a screen, and the screen area is lower do to the wider aspect ratio.

Re:Gee, they're going to build an ARM-based comput (1)

GarretSidzaka (1417217) | about 10 months ago | (#45323221)

i've not loved the ARM "all-winner" tablets. the manufacturers usually put poor capacitive touch and they are troublesome to CWM

Have they looked on eBay or Hobby King? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45322683)

Build? Just source the right part from any of the dozen Chinese manufacturers on Alibaba in the worst case.

Re:Have they looked on eBay or Hobby King? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45323161)

Half the kickstarter projects are just that. people re-sourcing crap from alibaba and taking profit on it.

As much as I want to like the idea of kickstarter, too many rip off artists in the world will take advantage of it.

16:10... I approve (1)

gman003 (1693318) | about 10 months ago | (#45322705)

Yes, 1280x800 is a horribly small resolution. But at least it's a good aspect ratio. 4:3 is bad for entertainment use - movies, games, and the like. 16:9 is similarly weak in productive use - even putting two windows side-by-side, it's not tall enough, and rotating it to portrait mode is often laughable. But, IMO, 16:10 is a good compromise - it works well for anything you do with it.

If it weren't for the fact that 2560x1600 monitors are absurdly overpriced compared to 2560x1440, I'd have gotten one of those for my primary monitor instead.

Re:16:10... I approve (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45322831)

It's also the closest popular ratio to the golden ratio (1:1.61819...), making it much more attractive, visually. I paid about 150% the price of a similar 1080p screen to get my 1920:1200 screen. Totally worth it.

Re:16:10... I approve (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45322887)

The golden ratio is hippie horseshit.

Re:16:10... I approve (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45322909)

agreed

Re:16:10... I approve (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45322971)

You mean ancient Greek horse shit.

Re:16:10... I approve (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45323575)

You know the Greek word for horse?

Re:16:10... I approve (1)

TheSeatOfMyPants (2645007) | about 10 months ago | (#45323731)

Would anyone really be likely to use a 9" screen hooked up to a RPi for any of those endeavors, though? Iworked recently with an old computer of mine with an 11" monitor, and it felt cramped enough that Iwouldn't use it if Ihad a larger screen of any sort available.

That said, don't forget that there's a growing number of people getting into older games, which were primarily written for 4:3 screens, as are a lot of games written for use in a windowed environment (some genres are also more comfortable for me that way, I've noticed). For productivity or reading on a small screen, Ifind 16:10 only slightly nicer than 16:9. (The 16:x can be useful on a 22" screen the once or twice a year I compare documents, but yeah, that's about it. My Nook Simple Touch taught me that 3:4 is excellent for e-books or writing/editing documents on a 6" screen, on the other hand.)

After seeing this Wikipedia diagram [wikimedia.org] , what I think would work best on a small screen is a 3:2 that can switch orientations. As it's directly between 16:10 and 4:3, I think it would offer the benefits of both while minimizing their drawbacks. It's a shame the industry is so damned focused on video that we're unlikely to see it even on a productivity-oriented device.

129euro (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45322759)

for 129 euros i can buy a 21" 1080P display with HDMI.

BEST BUY IZ WALMART !! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45322761)

In the corner with the other PC crap on the tables you find monitors on the cheap !! If you want cheap PC crap Best Buy is you WalMart !!

HDMIPi? Come on! (3, Interesting)

glitch0 (859137) | about 10 months ago | (#45322769)

HDM-Pi sounds so much better than HDMI-Pi. How did they let that one slip through the cracks?

Re:HDMIPi? Come on! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45323107)

Theirs is pronounced HD My Pi. Did you let that one slip through the cracks?

Re:HDMIPi? Come on! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45323737)

I bet you say SEQUEL. You sicken me!

nine inches?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45322781)

Oh goody! It's an original Macintosh all over again, except this time it's dirt cheap instead of horribly expensive.

RemoteX (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45322789)

Maybe someone is building a portable emulator. I don't know. I never had the need to physically connect mine to a display. I either ssh and if I really need to see an application I bring it up using remote X

Fuck a TACO (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45322867)

and the striki8g Completely before

Re:Fuck a TACO (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45322917)

Fill that Taco with COCK SAUCE

Found several... (1, Insightful)

evilviper (135110) | about 10 months ago | (#45322999)

This project would be nothing if not for the clever marketing of linking this to the Raspberry Pi. Otherwise, it's just an overpriced, under-spec'd and under-featured monitor. With the switch to HDTV, every cheap little TV out there has HDMI inputs, and can incidentally also work as a TV:

19" HDTV under $100:

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Seiki-SE19HY10-19-720p-60Hz-LED-HDTV/28379383 [walmart.com]

7" HDMI touch, under $100:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=161137962772 [ebay.com]

Re:Found several... (2)

linuxguy (98493) | about 10 months ago | (#45323127)

Don't be a doofus. Is the 19" one portable? No! And that is important to some of us. We already have large/cheap displays. We want portable/cheap displays!

The 7" one you listed is utter joke. First of all it is not under $100. You forgot to look at the sneaky $70 shipping charge. After you add that, you are looking at $150. Oh and you also forgot to look at the resolution. 1024x768. It seems that you haven't been paying attention. But, by now, that isn't surprising.

Re:Found several... (2)

evilviper (135110) | about 10 months ago | (#45323621)

The 7" one you listed is utter joke. First of all it is not under $100. You forgot to look at the sneaky $70 shipping charge. After you add that, you are looking at $150.

A fair point, but there are many, many, MANY others without the ridiculous shipping charges:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Car-9-Digital-Stand-alone-Headrest-Monitor-Screen-HDMI-VGA-Port-Touch-Button-HD-/171098185346 [ebay.com]

Re:Found several... (2)

tgd (2822) | about 10 months ago | (#45323961)

Don't be a doofus. Is the 19" one portable?

It could be. Just tell everyone its your MagnumPi.

Re: MagnumPi (1)

ITMagic (683618) | about 10 months ago | (#45324327)

Either this one slipped by passed the majority of mods, or I have a warped sense of humour. If I had any mod-points, this would definately get +5 Funny.

those aren't proper ones (2)

dutchwhizzman (817898) | about 10 months ago | (#45323481)

The 19" isn't portable, like someone else also said. The 7" is a second hand one, they are $129 new and have a native resolution of 800*480.

Re:those aren't proper ones (1)

evilviper (135110) | about 10 months ago | (#45323611)

The 7" is a second hand one,

Oh yeah?

Condition: New: A brand-new, unused, unopened, undamaged item in its original packaging (where packaging is applicable). Packaging should be the same as what is found in a retail store, unless the item is handmade or was packaged by the manufacturer in non-retail packaging, such as an unprinted box or plastic bag.

Re:Found several... (3, Interesting)

AmiMoJo (196126) | about 10 months ago | (#45324147)

7" HDMI touch, under $100:

Not at all comparable. For a start it's a private one-off eBay listing, not something that anyone can buy from a website. It is also not HD, and in my experience you often can't use this kind of screen's native resolution directly as it is designed to only accept SD, 720p and maybe 1080i. That's okay for a TV but useless for a computer where you want sharp pixel perfect font rendering.

Not just for Raspberry Pi (5, Interesting)

linuxguy (98493) | about 10 months ago | (#45323151)

I shoot videos with my DSLR. And I have often wanted a portable HDMI monitor for my rig. When I looked, I was quite surprised to find out that no reasonable options exist. Most portable HDMI monitors utterly suck. They are bulky and max out the resolution at 800x480 or 1024x768. The ones that do not suck are uber expensive. Since this is just a hobby for me, I did not want to shell out the big bucks.

I have been quite surprised that I can buy a $200 Nexus 7 tablet with 1080P display, but cannot get a 1080p or even a 720p portable monitor for anything even close to that.

Already done. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45323379)

Why are they raising money for something that already exists?
http://www.chalk-elec.com/?page_id=1280#!/~/product/category=3094861&id=14647633

Or, better, get a BeagleBoard and a LVDS board.

Re:Already done. (1)

linuxguy (98493) | about 10 months ago | (#45323601)

1. You assume that everybody has an LVDS panel lying around that they can use with the HDMI-LVDS converter you linked to.
2. The HDMI-LVDS converter you linked to costs $53. $35 + $18 shipping. I am not sure why 50 gram package costs $18 to ship. Shady. USPS can ship a small flat rate box anywhere in the country for about $5. And that is for 2-day delivery.

For some of us a package that includes panel, case and a converter is a better way to go than an overpriced converter alone.

16:10 Win (1)

SD-Arcadia (1146999) | about 10 months ago | (#45323617)

They got the aspect ratio right, that's for sure. Can't say that for many monitors coming to the market since 2007.

Given that Atrix dock is cheap and can be hacked (1)

tlambert (566799) | about 10 months ago | (#45323691)

Given that Atrix dock is cheaper than the target price and can be hacked (and we did just that at Google when Hexxeh interned there), why not just make a plastic case with a couple of connectors on it, and clip the Pi into it?

Re:Given that Atrix dock is cheap and can be hacke (1)

topologicalanomaly47 (1226068) | about 10 months ago | (#45324079)

Yes, I have one myself and it's a great device. I also use it as a portable HDMI montior but the keyboard makes it a bit cumbersome. But they are getting harder and harder to find and also the new found interest seems to be driving prices back up.

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