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Is Montana the Next Big Data Hub?

samzenpus posted about 6 months ago | from the big-sky-big-cloud dept.

Data Storage 164

rye (208438) writes "Montana is positioning itself as the next hub for big data and cyber security. With companies like Symantec and IBM investing heavily in high-tech development, the opening of University of Montana's new Cyber Innovation Laboratory, and statewide competitions such as this weekend's Montana Cyber Triathlon (which had the coolest trophy ever), the momentum is strong. Cheap labor, cheap space and the Northern Tier backbone (with stretches over 600 miles across the width of Montana) are all contributing to the new tech growth. Even Congress is jumping on the bandwagon: Montana Rep. Steve Daines, a member of the House Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection and Security, recently said 'Technology has removed geography as a constant.'"

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Nope. (2)

DrPBacon (3044515) | about 6 months ago | (#46918485)

Not really.

Monwhere? (1)

flyingfsck (986395) | about 6 months ago | (#46918657)

For those wondering where it is, Montana is the US boondocks somewhere south of Canada.

Re:Monwhere? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918891)

Great, that just confused me more, and now I am not sure what the difference is between Montana and New England. (Also the rest of the US.)

Re:Monwhere? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919053)

just the way we like it.

Re:Monwhere? (0)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 6 months ago | (#46919127)

Montana is where dental floss comes from.

Re:Monwhere? (1)

plopez (54068) | about 6 months ago | (#46919255)

Frank is that you?

Re:Monwhere? (1)

NatasRevol (731260) | about 6 months ago | (#46919637)

Actually, Montana is completely north of the southern most point of Canada.

http://kottke.org/14/05/us-sta... [kottke.org]

Re:Monwhere? (2)

callmetheraven (711291) | about 6 months ago | (#46920063)

Montana is full. And it sucks here. We have two seasons: Winter (9mos) and Fire (3mos). There are no jobs. Don't move here. Please.

An educated workforce (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918501)

An educated workforce is still a geographical constant. Montana isn't exactly known for its world-class educational institutions. And cattle ranching doesn't need a whole lot of education.

Re:An educated workforce (2)

datapharmer (1099455) | about 6 months ago | (#46918859)

Try it yourself. You might find out that to be successful at it requires skill and education. I have family there that are one of two families left in a several hundred mile radius that are still farming successfully. All the rest gave up or gave out. Between droughts, harsh winters and fluctuations in feed prices it isn't as easy as watch some cows munch grass, and yes, they are educated and have dedicated fiber running straight to the farm that far surpasses the quality of dsl I can get in the city here in Florida.

Re:An educated workforce (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918925)

Apparently they aren't educated enough to know what anecdotal evidence is.

Re:An educated workforce (1)

CRCulver (715279) | about 6 months ago | (#46919741)

My experiences cycling across South Africa last winter, where I often stopped for the night at a local farm because there wasn't anything else for the next 100km, did much to disabuse me of the notion that large-scale farmers and ranchers are uneducated. Many of them had done rigorous university studies in the big city before coming back to the middle of nowhere, and they still kept up with the latest scholarly literature to maximise gains.

However, their education was specifically on fields useful to farming and ranching such as chemistry, biology, veterinary sciences, economics, etc. They had no background in computer science, and though they had a network brought out to the farm to allow them to track e.g. feed prices, they didn't know much about how said network or their computers worked. So, I understand the OP's suspicion that Montana may lack an educated workforce capable of luring IT firms.

Re:An educated workforce (1)

callmetheraven (711291) | about 6 months ago | (#46920099)

Nope. We're all toothless hillbillies. Montana is horrible.

Re:An educated workforce (1)

plopez (54068) | about 6 months ago | (#46919277)

Most STEM degrees at the undergraduate level are equivalent. It is only in grad school that differentiation occurs. Logic is logic. Java is Java. Differential equations are differential equations no matter where on the globe you are.

Re:An educated workforce (2)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 6 months ago | (#46919623)

Most STEM degrees at the undergraduate level are equivalent.

Take ten people with CS degrees from MIT. Take ten more with CS degrees from the University of Phoenix. Give them each a programming assignment that should take about an hour. It is highly unlikely that the results will be "equivalent".

Re:An educated workforce (1)

plopez (54068) | about 6 months ago | (#46920089)

Why do you say highly unlikely? If everyone completes the same basic courses then that is evidence their intelligence is about equivalent.

Re:An educated workforce (1)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 6 months ago | (#46920237)

Why do you say highly unlikely?

You have a serious detachment from reality if you think Univ of Phoenix graduates will, on average, perform as well as MIT graduates.

If everyone completes the same basic courses ...

But they are NOT "the same". Classes at top tier schools have better instructors, more rigorous standards, more and harder assignments, and more competitive students.

Re:An educated workforce (1)

Bengie (1121981) | about 6 months ago | (#46919647)

A good STEM degree doesn't just signify knowledge, but also understanding. Learning how to identify the best tool for the job, or even creating a new tool, requires more than just knowledge.

Re:An educated workforce (1)

plopez (54068) | about 6 months ago | (#46920121)

Measuring understanding is hard. But I will contend that if two people get equivalent degrees with equivalent grades their understanding will be approximately equivalent. And I will also posit that real depth of understanding only comes after several years of experience.

This ad brought to you by Montana! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918507)

We have electricty you know!

Cheap Labor (2)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 6 months ago | (#46918537)

Cheap labor seems to be the thing that stands out the most. I would think that labor is only cheap in Montana because land is cheap, and therefore people can live for less money. When even a modest house is , you don't have to wonder why they have to pay people so much to work there. Even if you pay the workers the same amount, you can attract a lot of talent because they'll be able to live that much more comfortably.

Re:Cheap Labor (2)

alen (225700) | about 6 months ago | (#46918607)

maybe for you, but for a lot of people you have to pay them more to live in a place with no Starbucks, no Whole Foods Market, no sushi, no thai food

and generally any place where the only kinds of restaurants are american food

Re:Cheap Labor (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 6 months ago | (#46918711)

Yeah, I think there needs to be a happy medium ground somewhere. Paying $1,000,000 for a house isn't my idea of a good time, but neither is travelling 300 miles every time you want to do some shopping. The point is, there's no reason for everything in be in one place. There are plenty of cities with a reasonable cost of living, that don't required that you forgo a modern lifestyle.

Re:Cheap Labor (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918975)

hahahaha, forgo a modern lifestyle, what do you think we all burn would heat in the winter and have to trudge through snow to the outhouse? Seriously, i would like to know what you think is missing for modern lifestyle, is it sushi, because we have plenty of that, i eat it more than burgers. and i don't waste my money on starbucks, but if you want too i don't think you would have trouble finding one, no whole foods, but that's ok, where do you think the organic farms are anyway? We have a couple Asian markets even, so you can make your own thia food, if your that worried about it. Our network infrastructure is not bad, we suffer from the same things as every other community, too few choices do to duopoly status of the existing players, but my 30Mbps connection isn't bad, and it doesn't go down nearly as often as my internet did in florida, and 4g coverage is getting there, Verizon has been up for awhile, and at&t is starting to get theirs going now, like i said its not the greatest, but its not that bad, you can actually go out of town a bit and still have signal. Would it be nice to have a little more choice, sure, but its not lacking anything you need to live a "modern" lifestyle, whatever your definition.

Re:Cheap Labor (3, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 6 months ago | (#46919155)

Lest anyone be concerned, the last time I was in Montana, I saw plenty of paragraphs and capital letters.

Re:Cheap Labor (2)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 6 months ago | (#46919149)

Missoula (the U of M town) is sort of like a pre Starbucks Austin. Fairly liberal, small but vibrant community. Lots of problems, but nothing unusual in that. Great hiking, camping, skiing.

There are worse places to live, by far.

Re:Cheap Labor (1)

callmetheraven (711291) | about 6 months ago | (#46920151)

They got rid of Missoula during the "restore the valley" campaign. It doesn't exist anymore. And even then the whole valley is ten feet deep in snow until August.

Facts are your Friend, Not Generalizations (2)

Aero77 (1242364) | about 6 months ago | (#46918753)

Google Maps, search nearby, Starbucks, Sushi, Whole Foods.

Re:Cheap Labor (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918879)

Are you implying Montana has no star bucks or ethnic food? I assume these data centers will be around Billings or Missoula, not a random small town, both places have multiple sushi places, thai food, indian food, and a host of other ethnic foods.

Re:Cheap Labor (1)

Sporkinum (655143) | about 6 months ago | (#46919045)

At least they have both types of music. Country and Western.

Re:Cheap Labor (4, Informative)

LWATCDR (28044) | about 6 months ago | (#46919189)

" no Starbucks, no Whole Foods Market, no sushi, no thai food"
7 Thai restaurants in Billings.
8 Sushi in Billings
45 Coffee shops including Starbucks.
No Whole Foods but the Good Earth Market and Natural Grocers can fill the bill for a lot of people and you also have Costco.

Re:Cheap Labor (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46920317)

WTF man don't *tell* them. Let them keep their delusions. We don't want their kind in Montana anyway. It's pretty great as it is.

Re:Cheap Labor (4, Insightful)

gsslay (807818) | about 6 months ago | (#46919315)

Pardon me, while I snort with derision at the notion that Starbucks is a measure of sophistication and diversity.

Oh my soul for mod points! (1)

DerekLyons (302214) | about 6 months ago | (#46919815)

Oh my soul for mod points!

Re:Cheap Labor (5, Funny)

cve (181337) | about 6 months ago | (#46920037)

I hate it when I'm in farm country and can't find a Whole Foods to get fresh food.

Re:Cheap Labor (1)

luis_a_espinal (1810296) | about 6 months ago | (#46920157)

maybe for you, but for a lot of people you have to pay them more to live in a place with no Starbucks, no Whole Foods Market, no sushi, no thai food

and generally any place where the only kinds of restaurants are american food

Have you ever heard of a phrase that goes like this? "Just fucking google it"?

I have a hard time thinking Montana folks would have difficulties finding organic food. Plus sushi and thai foods are pretty much as American now as chicken pie, you find them everywhere except in the poorest of towns (not isolated, but poorest, poorest != isolated.).

The only concern I would have to relocate to a state like Montana is the ability to live in a cosmopolitan city with several 4-year degree college options for my kids as well as the ease or difficulty of international travel (I prefer not to switch from one airplane to another, thank you very much.) Other than that, overpriced food staples are not the epitome of eclectic living.

Re:Cheap Labor (3, Insightful)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 6 months ago | (#46918659)

Missing link and words

When even a modest house is $1,000,000 in San Francisco [slate.com] , you don't have to wonder.....

Re:Cheap Labor (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918781)

Missing link and words

  When even a modest house is $1,000,000 in San Francisco [slate.com] , you don't have to wonder.....

I have a house of the same square footage as that San Fransisco example, which cost me 16% as much just outside of Chicago and you know that house in San Francisco doesn't sit on a half-acre lot either.

Re:Cheap Labor (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919027)

it does site on an earthquake fault line though, and it's close to the ocean!

Re:Cheap Labor (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919681)

Yeah not sure if I'm far enough from New Madrid to be "safe" when the next big quake occurs but at least they're only once or twice a millenia or so.

Couldn't give that much of a damn about being near the ocean really, I don't like the beach that much anyhow.

Re:Cheap Labor (1)

NatasRevol (731260) | about 6 months ago | (#46919699)

And getting closer all the time....

Re:Cheap Labor (1)

luis_a_espinal (1810296) | about 6 months ago | (#46920111)

Missing link and words When even a modest house is $1,000,000 in San Francisco [slate.com] , you don't have to wonder.....

Cold, hard facts like those where the ones that quickly disabused my wife and I from the notion of relocating our entire family to the Bay Area.

It makes no sense to be in SV (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919221)

You see, this is the way to do it. Instead of insisting of being in San Francisco and surrounding areas, these companies went somewhere else, developed the talent and will have reduced costs significantly.

No bitching about lack of talent or not being able to find qualified people. They have a problem and they solve it. That is effective management and leadership..

Just remember that when you hear the tech entrepreneurs bitch and moan: they are amateurs (who got lucky) and have no business being leaders or managers.

And remember that the next time folks want to disparage managers.

if you can't go to walmart at lunch time (1)

NemoinSpace (1118137) | about 6 months ago | (#46918541)

Your infrastructure is insufficient.

Re:if you can't go to walmart at lunch time (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919771)

Your infrastructure is insufficient.

If you're using your lunch break to go to Wal-Mart then you're doing it wrong.

Not Quite, but Improving (5, Informative)

Maxwell Rebo (3639719) | about 6 months ago | (#46918543)

Being from Montana, and having been involved in the startup scene there, I can say that these developments are definitely an improvement but it still has a long ways to go. The main hangups for Montana are: -Remoteness (expensive to fly into / out of) -Lack of competitive talent (all the talent moves to bigger cities for work) But the pluses are substantial: -Great taxes (both current and previous governor, senators did a lot to improve tax situation for small-mid sized businesses) -Attractive work environment: proximity to Glacier Park, Yellowstone, lots of other great places to explore -As the article mentions, plenty of relatively cheap space to work in If they can manage to make the travel situation more fluid and less expensive, and find ways to keep top talent from moving to San Francisco or New York, they'll do well.

Upgraded backbone? (1)

Bengie (1121981) | about 6 months ago | (#46918547)

To get from the Midwest to Cali, my trace route goes to Chicago, then Dallas, then Cali. Maybe with a stronger trunk going through Montana, we can get a route that goes a bit more northern for a shorter distance.

Technology has removed geography as a constant (3, Insightful)

Overzeetop (214511) | about 6 months ago | (#46918563)

So, how's Montana doing on the whole "we love a diverse population that looks like the whole world" thing?

Re:Technology has removed geography as a constant (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919093)

Why would you want a diverse population?

Re:Technology has removed geography as a constant (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919161)

Why would you want a diverse population?

Because men of color wants a blonde wife.

Re:Technology has removed geography as a constant (1)

StatureOfLiberty (1333335) | about 6 months ago | (#46919197)

'Diverse' the population, the easier it is to get re-elected?

is momkind the next big step in our (r)evolution (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918619)

was there ever any doubt? http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=mom+kind+spirit+dna

Not enough people (2, Insightful)

putaro (235078) | about 6 months ago | (#46918625)

Montana's total population is just slightly above 1 million. SF Bay Area is more like 7.4 million with a much higher percentage of tech workers. So, no, Montana isn't going to be the next tech hub because there aren't enough workers there. Might be a place for DC's if there's enough bandwidth.

Re:Not enough people (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918805)

That might not be a bad thing. I live in a city that went from 300,000 people to over two million in about 10 years, and houses went from $30,000 for a nice house to $250,000 for a place where you will be spending 45-60 minutes for a commute. To boot, there are not the Bay Area amenities and no parks either (well, except for Zilker, which requires a taxi to go to.) If you want a zoo, you have to drive 90 miles to another city.

I would be happy to move to a relatively small town of tech-minded people. It would mean that crime would be lower (tech people tend to be intelligent enough to properly defend themselves, or find a way to do that), the bigwigs that foul up local governments wouldn't consider that town a target, and if there are not amenities, they would be put in. Heavy snow? Not an issue if the town builds tunnels or covered walkways.

The trick is to keep the town tech oriented, but keep the celebrities and fashionistas wanting to remain in LA, NYC, or Austin.

Re:Not enough people (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919627)

To boot, there are not the Bay Area amenities and no parks either

I live in Minnesota and have visited the Bay Area a couple of times. Amenities, you are spot on: they are a little expensive, but they are there, and certainly more interesting and diverse than what we can obtain in Minnesota.

But what people in the Bay Area call "parks" we call "walking out your front door" in Minnesota.

Also, Muir Woods? I'm happy that there is some patch of land that still has trees in the Bay Area, but it was kind of sad seeing how many people flocked to that place on a holiday weekend. I can't imagine that there was a whole lot of "woodsy" feeling left by the time all of those people were packed into it. Having said that, I did encounter some very nice parks/woods/trails *well outside* of the Bay Area in Northern CA.

Parent is referring to Austin (1)

TuaAmin13 (1359435) | about 6 months ago | (#46919651)

Just FYI, the parent is referring to Austin, TX. They had a huge population growth period but the city was under the mentality of "If we don't build it, they won't come." They were wrong, so Austin has something like the 4th worst traffic [chron.com] in the US and a cost of living somewhat like Atlanta.

Re:Not enough people (1)

RicktheBrick (588466) | about 6 months ago | (#46919125)

I can make a case for my hometown, Ludington, Michigan.
1. We have cheap labor hear.
2. We are close to several large cities(Chicago is only about 250 miles) and Universities(Michigan State, University of Michigan)
3. We have one of the largest pumped storage plants in the world for power.
4. A very small part of that water could be used for cooling. The temperature of Lake Michigan is still under 40 degrees.
5. We have 56 windmills in the county. There is a large potential area in the center of Lake Michigan for a huge number of windmills. There is a lot of wind there and no one lives there.
6. We have a harbor for recreational and commercial boating that has access to the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico.
7. We have a large state and national park and a lot of small inland lakes for recreation.
8. Lake Michigan keeps us cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter than the rest of the state.
9. We do not worry about hurricanes, earthquakes, floods, and even tornadoes as they are either never here or extremely rare.

Re:Not enough people (1)

Aqualung812 (959532) | about 6 months ago | (#46919731)

While these are good points, you did forget to point out the 2.7 metric fucktons of snow that Lake Michigan deposits on you.

Re:Not enough people (1)

weeboo0104 (644849) | about 6 months ago | (#46919915)

My wife and I visited Ludington a few years ago. I love the West side of Michigan.
We were really impressed by the number of people that turned out on a Saturday morning the week before Memorial Day to plant flowers and beautify the town for Tourist season. If an employer looking for a Senior System Engineer was in Ludington or even Muskegon, we would move there in a heartbeat.

Re:Not enough people (1)

Bengie (1121981) | about 6 months ago | (#46919135)

And 10 years from now? Creating these datacenters will create demand for people to move or get educated.

Economics (3, Interesting)

jamesl (106902) | about 6 months ago | (#46918679)

Companies used to locate based on availability of transportation -- rivers, ports etc. Now it's a data pipe.

Re:Economics (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918747)

Transportation still matters when you're making physical goods.

Re:Economics (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919023)

My employer makes physical goods, our vendors have zero problem getting us material and we have zero problem getting our product to our customers, even in the middle of winter, on time or even early. Sure we might have 4000 flights a day coming/going from major cities, but we have zero problem getting goods shipped nationally or internationally year around.

Re:Economics (1)

Sporkinum (655143) | about 6 months ago | (#46919095)

And how much the state is will to pay in tax breaks to get them there. Here in Iowa, Facebook, Microsoft, and Google have all put in or are putting in, large data centers.

Recruiting? (3, Insightful)

anlashok (120734) | about 6 months ago | (#46918723)

I would think if this was even somewhat true it would be evident from attempts to recruit talent from outside Montana. I haven't heard or seen any postings to attract experienced talent. This sounds like another "Promote the story to get more funds from the government" and press for the local politicians to start another mediocre fake Silicon Valley. Another place to put technology that only needs cheap inexperienced labor from the local schools. A warehouse for servers where the only talent needed is ability to push a button for hard reboot and pull out a drive or motherboard... A+ Certified only requirement, unless thats too expensive. The more experienced employees will still be elsewhere remoting in when needed.
Or am I just being too harsh :-)

Broadband (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918727)

I have to wonder how Montana will be a tech hub of any sort when their broadband coverage is so poor. You can get DSL if you're in a city or near a ski resort. Fiber and cable are out. Heck even their mobile phone coverage is second worst next to Alaska.

Don't think any place in Canada is a good place (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918731)

But then what do I know.

Re:Don't think any place in Canada is a good place (1)

flyingfsck (986395) | about 6 months ago | (#46918767)

Well, Montana is in the USA you dum-dum. It is so poorly developed, the people drive hundreds of miles north to Calgary in Canada to shop.

Re:Don't think any place in Canada is a good place (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 6 months ago | (#46918769)

Canada's in Montana...

Why is the coolest trophy ever... (1)

lfourrier (209630) | about 6 months ago | (#46918745)

...not in liquid nitrogen ?

cheap for data center cooling, too (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918773)

This is one of the places where you can freeze a bunch of water in the winter and melt it during the summer to provide cooling for the data center; and that's if it's not just pulling in outside air to do the cooling. Most of the year the daily high is 70F, except in June, July, August.

And it's not like you need teams of software developers standing by: it's a data comm facility. I'm not sure the staffing problem is as big as some of the commenters have claimed. Yes, it's a pain to get to Montana quickly, but if all you're doing is trucking a bunch more server racks., then you're probably in just a good a situation in Montana as anywhere else.

BTW, I'm sure you can get sushi and all the modern stuff in Bozeman. Montana isn't all that backwards.

Re:cheap for data center cooling, too (1)

mlts (1038732) | about 6 months ago | (#46918871)

Assuming some backhoe resistance on lines, Montana makes sense for data centers. It is well out of the way geographically from the more populated areas, and other than winter, there isn't much in the way of natural disasters that could come that way. As stated above, the cold climate makes it perfect for a data center.

Only downside is that people would have to live quite near the data center if a blizzard happens, but done right, that shouldn't be much of an issue if planned right.

Re:cheap for data center cooling, too (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | about 6 months ago | (#46919441)

...other than winter, there isn't much in the way of natural disasters that could come that way...

What about the Yellowstone caldera?

Re:cheap for data center cooling, too (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919661)

How will Old Faithful affect a data center hundreds of miles away? The caldera is inactive. There is a far higher risk of twisters in southern states, than an old volcano suddenly popping its top without warning.

Re:cheap for data center cooling, too (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919855)

...other than winter, there isn't much in the way of natural disasters that could come that way...

What about the Yellowstone caldera?

Meaning "frequent" disasters, like tornado seasons or a very active fault line. Anyhow you'll have much bigger problems than getting your email when Yellowstone erupts.

Getting a kick out of these replies... (5, Informative)

Mefesto44 (1031702) | about 6 months ago | (#46918797)

As the Network Administrator for the largest independent Primary Care facility in Montana I'm getting a kick out of these replies. Montana is awesome. Like, REALLY awesome if you enjoy the outdoors. I love to fish, snowmobile, hike, dirt bike, cruise the lakes and rivers, kayak, snowboard, camp.... this place is heaven on earth. However, be prepared to take a significant pay cut to live here. My current position pays me almost less than half of what my job would pull in major metropolitan areas. This fact alone is why a lot of people would never consider living here. Property taxes aren't cheap for homeowners and first time home buyers are in for a shock that the cheapest decent homes on the market in my area are selling for around $250,000 - $280,000. I moved here from Atlanta about 20 years ago and some of my friends are scoring 3,000 - 4,000 sqft homes under $200,000 that are REALLY nice. Combine the high cost of first time home ownership with low wages and you can see why it isn't very attractive to live here on paper. But, if I have to be honest, I LOVE it this way. It keeps the big open spaces open (for now), population centers aren't overcrowded, and our populace is generally very happy and content. Usually I enjoy telling people this place sucks so they don't even think of moving here.

Re:Getting a kick out of these replies... (3, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 6 months ago | (#46919287)

He's lying folks. Really, his salary is $500K / yr, he lives in a 4000 sq foot mansion that he paid $100,000 for and he gets all the bison he can eat. He's just not very social and doesn't want neighbors.

Just like the rest of us.

So, lets all move to Montana and say 'howdy'!

Re:Getting a kick out of these replies... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919473)

Got my first full time software development job in Missoula and can barely afford my rent much less buy a house. I love it here in Montana and will probably look into a career in forestry(GIS / surveying) so I can live and work out of town. If there are tons of opportunity for high paying jobs in Montana cities I've not seen it. I'd love to get paid enough to settle down here.

Re:Getting a kick out of these replies... (2)

DerekLyons (302214) | about 6 months ago | (#46919857)

As the Network Administrator for the largest independent Primary Care facility in Montana I'm getting a kick out of these replies.

Indeed... every time one of these stories gets posted, we get a flood of the same kind of replies "it's not McHipsterville, so nobody will want to live there". Get the hell over yourselves Slashdot. Not everyone is a McHipster.

Water (0)

fermion (181285) | about 6 months ago | (#46918803)

Back around 2000, I saw firms considering moving from location that had abundant water and power to locations that did not have abundant water and power. I thought they were crazy, but you the lemming push for everyone to herd and go over the cliff is great.

I don't know if Montana has power issues, but I do know that they felt is was worthwhile to sue Wyoming over what amounted to about 10,000 acre feet of water.

And, of course, as mentioned, if you have data. There might be a backbone, but that is like saying California had a redundant electricity grid, except for the time it did not.

mynuts won; kudos to /. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46918813)

good sports good spirits & a variety of motives since linux was a pup...

Considering that the next story... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919057)

... is about Kerry defending the US surveillance practice, I don't see any place in the US as a hub for anything medium to long term.

I've been there (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919071)

Montana's outdoors is really breathtaking, and it's definitely not overcrowded by any standards. So looks like an ideal place for introverts and nature people. There's one big minus from my perspective though: everyone you talk to is a hunter, and often a very passionate one, and this really permeates the culture and daily life. "Gun-crazy Americans" comes to mind (I'm from Canada). If you prefer your nature bloodless, you may feel uncomfortable there at times.

Re:I've been there (4, Informative)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 6 months ago | (#46919341)

While there is a grain of truth to that, don't over do it. Yes, you have to get used to a gun culture, but it's remarkably low key. It's just 'normal'. Most hunters (certainly not all) understand that some people don't like to see bloody real things or talk about them. Most rural folks are rather polite and even fairly tolerant.

It might do you some good to be around a culture that just uses guns as tools. Yes, there is a smattering of scary militia types, but you find them pretty much everywhere except downtown NYC. Even with those clowns, if you don't bother them (well advised), they won't bother you.

Here in Alaska, it's not unusual to see someone hitching down the road with a hunting rifle. And getting picked up. Humans can get used to most anything.

politicians get it wrong.... again (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919143)

Technology has removed geography as a constant....

No, tech has enabled global communication and that's about it.

You still need hard products and services, which Montana doesn't have (facilities, schools, airports, etc...) though it offers great recreational and low cost of living.

Also, living in 75deg weather than 20 in the middle of Jan is a geographic constant tech can't fix.

NE Montana (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919237)

I do IT in NE Montana. It's pretty remote. I love the 5 minute commute but it is 3 hrs to the nearest Walmart.

Re:NE Montana (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919659)

but it is 3 hrs to the nearest Walmart

That's a bonus. Sign me up!

Re:NE Montana (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919853)

Yeah, local stores have most of what you need right away, otherwise there's Amazon, etal... I save a lot of money not buying stuff I don't really need.

No (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919269)

No. Montana sucks. Please don't move here...I mean there.

mod 0P (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919345)

Are there? Oh, arseholes at Walnut been lloking for! core team. They

mod d03n (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919375)

consider that right 48d reports and

Montana: guns, snares and few jobs. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919397)

You may have heard how a 17 yr/old exchange student from Germany as killed in a man's garage. Though the Missoula DA plans to press charges the "Stand Your Ground" laws(brought to you by the lovely NRA and friends) will show the killing was justified.
You can still use snares, yes snares to kill animals. Huge controversy here as many peoples pets are getting caught and hurt in these snares.
Then there was a case of a "hunter" who killed a man's dogs thinking they were wolves.
Due to the 19th century mentally of the majority of Montanan's wolfs are bad for the environment and take too many elk the hunters would get. The ranchers, not very different than Bundy(rancher who refuses to pay grazing fees in Nevada and talks about "Negros".) also like to see the wolves killed.
Many years back a rancher did ask the US Senator how was it working with the N-word in DC?

If you are non-white try finding a job not so easy..

Why Slashvertisments always hit Betteridge's law? (1)

MikeTheGreat (34142) | about 6 months ago | (#46919435)

Whenever someone Slashvertises something on /. with a post whose title is a question then (at least) one of us always brings up Betteridge's Law Of Headlines [wikipedia.org] . If not directly, then indirectly (like this [slashdot.org] ).

So why do they keep doing it? I gotta believe that if someone's paying for it that at least one customer would follow up with the results at least one time (and send feedback to whichever company/-ies slashvertise for them)

(Yes, my subject should be "Why do Slashvertisements...", but I ran out of characters :) )

I'm moving to Montana (1)

Megahard (1053072) | about 6 months ago | (#46919465)

Gonna be a dental floss tycoon.

I like this plan. (1)

thevirtualcat (1071504) | about 6 months ago | (#46919581)

In 30 years or so when I inherit my parents' home in Missoula, I'll be sitting pretty.

In the mean time, I can go visit them and enjoy the pre-Fairfax/Loudoun County-ized state of the area.

This seems like a win-win situation to me.

Montana (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919789)

Only cities that I know of are Billings, Missoula and Helena. The photos that I've seen of Montana Glacier Park (I think that is the name) is nice too.

It'll be interesting to see how companies build data centers in a rural state. Not many big airports I think. At least Montana has big highways to bring in heavy equipment. Or the construction crews can use a local firm to build the data center. Can''t comment about labor except that the population of Montana is low. Not only would the company need to bring materials in for construction, but the companies may need to bring or hire IT professionals (programmers, QA people, Managers, administrative staff) Good luck finding local IT professionals. I mean that in a good way.

I wonder if building data hubs to Montana will usher in more tech jobs. Maybe airlines will provide more service to Billings, Missoula and Helena and some rural cities. Maybe the rural cities will have office parks a few miles down the road with a park-and ride/car share lot nearby. Yeah, it'll be interesting to see how the smaller cities and towns will change when/if after big data centers are built in regards to infrastructure, public transit and the local economy.

Yeah but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919833)

It snows 11 months out of the year and you need to know how to ride a horse. Seriously you're going to ruin my 8 minute (12 by bike) commute. Plus it will be annoying if we need to get another area code. Stay away...

Montana is Great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46919945)

Until the Yosemite caldera turns it into an ash-laden, molten wasteland.

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