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New Findings On Graphene As a Conductor With IC Components

Unknown Lamer posted about 2 months ago | from the honey-I-shrunk-the-cpu dept.

Hardware 34

ClockEndGooner (1323377) writes Philadelphia's NPR affiliate, WHYY FM, reported today on their Newsworks program that a research team at the University of Pennsylvania have released their preliminary findings on the use of graphene as a conductor in the next generation of computer chips. From the article: "'It's very, very strong mechanically, and it is an excellent electronic material that might be used in future computer chips,' said Charlie Johnson, a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Pennsylvania. ... Future graphene transistors, Johnson said, are likely to be only tens of atoms across."

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OT: Queue the weekly /. stories ... (1, Offtopic)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | about 2 months ago | (#47553479)

* Graphene "miracle" Monday
* BitCoin "scandal" Tuesday
* Microsoft "who-cares" Wednesday
* Apple "hipster iShiny" Thursday
* Interesting news on Friday

--
"Get off my LAN" /grumpy-old-programmer

Re:OT: Queue the weekly /. stories ... (0)

geekoid (135745) | about 2 months ago | (#47553493)

Then leave.

Re:OT: Queue the weekly /. stories ... (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 2 months ago | (#47553591)

- Leave Slashdot on saturday
- Come back to Slashdot on sunday

Re:OT: Queue the weekly /. stories ... (1)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | about 2 months ago | (#47553793)

So you solution is to stick your head in the sand and ignore the problem? /sarcasm Great Advice. NOT.

Re:OT: Queue the weekly /. stories ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47553875)

So you solution is to stick your head in the sand and ignore the problem? /sarcasm Great Advice. NOT.

No, I believe his advice was to STFU and stop being a whiny little bitch.

The stuff you're complaining about hasn't fundamentally changed in 10 years.

Re:OT: Queue the weekly /. stories ... (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 2 months ago | (#47553937)

What problem? They post stories about what's going on in labs. You don't like that, so leave. Stop whining like a bitch and leave.
It's very simple.

Re:OT: Queue the weekly /. stories ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47554083)

Yeah, I get bitching isn't really helping anyone. But your logic is kinda weak too. It's akin to saying, "You don't like that the planet is turning into shit? Stop whining like a bitch and leave."

Re:OT: Queue the weekly /. stories ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47553593)

You forgot the weekly Bennett whiny blog posting.

Re:OT: Queue the weekly /. stories ... (1)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | about 2 months ago | (#47553845)

Actually I'm not familiar with that one. Link please?

Hey moron! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47553627)

It's spelled cue, not queue. Other than that, you're exactly right. Timothy Lord is still sniffing nitrite fumes while taking deep thrusts into the abdomen from Roblimo.
 
captcha: refills

Re:Hey moron! (1)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | about 2 months ago | (#47553647)

/*WHOOSH* programmer joke. Queue was intentional [slashdot.org]

Re:Hey moron! (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 2 months ago | (#47553953)

Man missuses word. claims it was a joke even though it would make no sense in the context. News at 11.

Re:Hey moron! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47554153)

Actually, either works.
'Cue': Signal that it is time to start the weekly stories.
'Queue': Line up the weekly stories, in FIFO order.

Re:Hey moron! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47555561)

Nice try, but we aren't that stupid.

Re:Hey moron! (1)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | about 2 months ago | (#47576527)

What part of FIFO do you not understand??

bad summary (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47553487)

'It's very, very strong mechanically, and it is an excellent electronic material that might be used in future computer chips,'

That's not even the new findings, but reading the summary, you might think so. Rather than instantly place blame on the submitter I read the writeup quoted and a better quote would've been:

"Publishing in the journal Nano Letters, the group found that for such ribbons -- just five atoms wide -- each atom could handle approximately one microampere of current."

Or any one of a dozen sentences from the first page of the first link....

Graphene this, graphene that (1)

war4peace (1628283) | about 2 months ago | (#47553535)

It's been what, couple years since I heard of Graphene. It apparently could do anything bar French Fries... in theory.
Any mainstream or even military implementations yet?

Let me know when it does something, for real, in real life. So far, it kind of says in the labs.

Re:Graphene this, graphene that (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 2 months ago | (#47553599)

Wow, graphene can talk, too?

Re:Graphene this, graphene that (1)

war4peace (1628283) | about 2 months ago | (#47553655)

Through drooling mouths of scientists.

Re:Graphene this, graphene that (2)

geekoid (135745) | about 2 months ago | (#47553629)

A) If you don't want to read about what's going on in a lab, go read CNN ad comment with those idiots.
B) There are several produce available right now and more are coming out all the time.

Stop complaining or go away.

Re:Graphene this, graphene that (1)

war4peace (1628283) | about 2 months ago | (#47553663)

B) There are several produce available right now and more are coming out all the time.

Citation needed.
Wikipedia says otherwise: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G... [wikipedia.org]

Re:Graphene this, graphene that (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 2 months ago | (#47554157)

Learn to use google.

https://head.com/g/us/graphene... [head.com]

http://www.vorbeck.com/graphen... [vorbeck.com]

Samsung has develop many phone models, but there aren't off the production line yet.

IT was made for the first time just 10 year ago. Now things are starting to come out, they have been demoed in real products outside the lab.

Re:Graphene this, graphene that (1)

slack_justyb (862874) | about 2 months ago | (#47555041)

Both those products are using a composite of graphene, just saying.

Re:Graphene this, graphene that (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47555423)

my pencil

"Graphite — or pencil lead– is formed when you stack graphene"
http://gigaom.com/2013/07/15/what-is-graphene-heres-what-you-need-to-know-about-a-material-that-could-be-the-next-silicon/

bang

Re:Graphene this, graphene that (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47555429)

Take your dick out of Jimob's mouth. How about actually looking up something yourself if you don't understand it.

I know of a great website; google.com.

Re:Graphene this, graphene that (1)

Ksevio (865461) | about 2 months ago | (#47554687)

It CAN do anything but it's hard to mass produce properly. All these cool lab uses have been able to make small quantities, but it would be too expensive to make it that way. Small imperfections can mess up a batch.

Graphene is awesome! (3, Insightful)

penguinoid (724646) | about 2 months ago | (#47553787)

Except for when it comes to actually building stuff with it.

The potential is there, obviously... but compare to how long it took to roll some up into simple tubes in an economically acceptable manner (ie, nanotubes are only just getting some actual use). I'm sure graphene as a computer component will be totally awesome -- but not until someone finds an *easy* way to build it, at most only 100X the cost of the equivalent in silicon.

Re:Graphene is awesome! (1)

TeethWhitener (1625259) | about 2 months ago | (#47554447)

Isolation of nanotubes (1991, Iijima) preceded isolation of graphene (2004, Geim & Novoselov) by over a decade. It's likely that the first commercial applications of graphene will be exfoliated graphite used as a component in polymer composites. It's cheap and the materials prep is straightforward and scalable. Electronics quality graphene (CVD-grown or SiC-derived epitaxial) is still fairly expensive, about $10/sqcm on Cu, though the price is plummeting as the bigger players (Samsung, IBM) get involved.

Toy for slashdotters (1)

penguinoid (724646) | about 2 months ago | (#47555081)

Actually, that reminds me... earlier today I read that you can make some interesting stuff by microwaving some graphite [sciencedaily.com] . Apparently it's "just like popcorn".

Well hell... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47553863)

I'll never be able to solder one of those babies...

Thanks for linking the paper (3)

Goldsmith (561202) | about 2 months ago | (#47554029)

Well, that's a terrible summary. At least they linked to the actual paper.

Good on Charlie for getting all this press out of the paper. This is continuation of work started when I worked in his lab (thin graphene transistors can be made with e-beam lithography, that gets you a bandgap and you can actually think about making a digital transistor, this paper has better measurements and better e-beam lithography - there now you don't have to read either of the papers).

It's not clear that any of this stuff will ever be used as actual digital logic. I think it's more likely to see commercialization as an analog transistor in a sensor (reason #1 - no e-beam litho required). Someone from Charlie's group will likely be part of making active graphene electronics work out. He's got former students or postdocs at Intel and IBM, and there are at least two of us with graphene based startup companies. So, we're working on making graphene electronics something other than an academic curiosity.

Re:Thanks for linking the paper (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47555437)

my thoughts on reading the summary was the memristors will likely be the next big generation of computer chips, with technology demonstrations in the lab and HP starting to beat the drum for their research

just gleaning from the article it seems that they want to arrange nano tubes, split them chemically and then fold them over... and then they will do,,, something (not mentioned in the article) to make then into transistors... It would seem to leverage the same logic as transistors (unlike memristors that require a new family of logic that merges processor and memory,) which would be a big advantage for adoption, so if they can manage the manufacturing and start spitting out working units then I'll bite

what's your take... Graphene transistors or memristors?

Is it just me? (1)

Pro923 (1447307) | about 2 months ago | (#47554041)

Or does it seem like they keep coming up with these cool shaped molecules, then spend years tying to figure out what to do with them?

Graphene based vacuum tubes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47555825)

A few weeks ago there was an article about vacuum tubes speeding along a 465GHz (http://spectrum.ieee.org/semiconductors/devices/introducing-the-vacuum-transistor-a-device-made-of-nothing) is there any point in making these out of graphene ?

(I have no clue what I'm talking about, just combining two hypeful techs :) )

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