Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

What's After Big Data?

Soulskill posted about three weeks ago | from the i'm-sure-the-marketroids-have-something-in-mind dept.

Businesses 87

gthuang88 writes: As the marketing hype around "big data" subsides, a recent wave of startups is solving a new class of data-related problems and showing where the field is headed. Niche analytics companies like RStudio, Vast, and FarmLink are trying to provide insights for specific industries such as finance, real estate, and agriculture. Data-wrangling software from startups like Tamr and Trifacta is targeting enterprises looking to find and prep corporate data. And heavily funded startups such as Actifio and DataGravity are trying to make data-storage systems smarter. Together, these efforts highlight where emerging data technologies might actually be used in the business world.

cancel ×

87 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Betteridge's law of headlines (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47730369)

NO!

A futile effort (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47730377)

It's like trainspotting, but for advertising memes.

Re:A futile effort (3, Informative)

lgw (121541) | about three weeks ago | (#47731405)

It's like trainspotting, but for advertising memes.

Gartner is the king/pusher of course. But I think they were actually insightful about this 5 or so years ago. They predicted about 3 year of all hype, no product "cloud", another 3 years of practical, useful cloud infrastructure with nothing really taking advantage of it, and only after that would we see startups (and VC investment opportunities) making use of the cloud to make actual products. I think we're almost there.

Even for hobby programming, the cloud is becoming quite appealing. For example, take a look at this remarkable Mabdelbrot zoom [youtube.com] to 10^275. This required 6 core-years to render (6 months wall clock). If you have the patience, the machines sitting idle (perhaps discarded bitcoin rigs) and no fear of power bills, then sure, turn on 3 old high-CPU towers for 6 months. But if you're good at massively parallel coding (and Mabdelbrot rendering is great to learn that!) you can usually get AWS Spot [amazon.com] machines for under a penny per core-hour. That means you can get that 6 core-years of CPU for about the price of a midrange geek PC, and you can get thousands of cores in parallel, and be done rendering in a day.

For a hobby project it might be hard to justify spending $hundreds this way, but for a start-up it makes perfect sense. So there's something to the "cloud" IMO if you're trying to do supercomputer parallelism on a shoestring budget, something that's really only become possible in the past couple of years. I'm not sure how cheap 10000 core-hours for $100 is, really, but 10000 cores in parallel for an hour for $100 is something wonderful.

Re:A futile effort (1)

SiapanPeteEllis (3731105) | about three weeks ago | (#47731869)

I agree completely with you and I think that real modeling and simulation will be the killer app for cloud technology.

Re:A futile effort (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47732047)

Amdahl would like to have a word with you. Not all parallel problems are embarassingly parallel.

bigger (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47730389)

data

Artisinal Data (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47731899)

After big data comes non-homogenized, organic, pasture-raised, hand-crafted, artisinal data.

A future data "science" conversation may look something like this:
Hipster Data Scientist #1: My data is more locally-sourced than yours!
Hipster Data Scientist #2: Nuh-uh! My data is fair-trade!

I can almost smell the smugness, ironic thick glasses, and beard envy now. :-)

I read it wrong (2)

olsmeister (1488789) | about three weeks ago | (#47730401)

looking to find and prep corporate data

I read as "looking to find and grep corporate data"...

Re:I read it wrong (1)

flopsquad (3518045) | about three weeks ago | (#47731551)

In this sense, what's "after big data" is a lovecraftian digital doomhoover wrought by the world's spy agencies.

I read it as bullshit (2)

u38cg (607297) | about three weeks ago | (#47731667)

RStudio is an IDE for the R language. When an author conflates that with whatever those other things are, you can be fairly sure whatever he's saying is likely to be up there on the bullshit scale.

I read it as bullshit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47733785)

RStudio is an IDE for the R language. When an author conflates that with whatever those other things are, you can be fairly sure whatever he's saying is likely to be up there on the bullshit scale.

The company named RStudio is heavily involved in developing R packages for niche use cases. Don't confuse the company (RStudio) with one of the products (RStudio) in their portfolio.

Re: I read it as bullshit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47737335)

ummm maybe they should change the name to rstudio IDE to
make it less of hassle. if your product and company name are the same then that's a stupid business Decision and one should and would see the two being the same.

Bigger data (4, Funny)

penguinoid (724646) | about three weeks ago | (#47730403)

After big data comes bigger data. Why, did you think otherwise?

Re:Bigger data (1)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47730439)

Bigger data
Super data
Mega data
Plaid data

Re:Bigger data (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47730457)

Followed by biggest data, then when that is shown to be too small, biggester data, then biggerbiggester data, etc.

Re:Bigger data (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47730549)

Sorry, it's marketing all the way down.

Re:Bigger data (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47731817)

Nope, check your facts please. It's big data all the way down until arrival to ridiculous big data.

Re:Bigger data (1)

aix tom (902140) | about three weeks ago | (#47732009)

Until you reach the big /dev/random at the center of the universe.

Re:Bigger data (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47735133)

No, no, we'll use olive sizing after that. I'm waiting for Super Colossal Data.

Re:Bigger data (2)

Tablizer (95088) | about three weeks ago | (#47731123)

What's next after Big Data?

Scientists recently uncovered dark data while trying to download information from a blackhole discovered at the Amazon headquarters marketing wing.

Re:Bigger data (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about three weeks ago | (#47731125)

I thought the thing I had in the 1990s was big data. Surely we must be in the humongous data age now.

Re:Bigger data (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47731719)

Bigger, Blacker Data

Re:Bigger data (1)

virgnarus (1949790) | about three weeks ago | (#47732073)

Mega Info

Re:Bigger data (1)

AlCapwn (1536173) | about three weeks ago | (#47732119)

We're approaching critical data. We'll hit a point were we'll have to generate new data based on existing stores or find new ways to use collected data.

Re:Bigger data (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about three weeks ago | (#47732143)

After big data comes bigger data. Why, did you think otherwise?

No, but what comes next?

Bragging.. My data is bigger than your data...

Followed by Big Data enhancement pills and tools sold though SPAM E-mails that promise noticeable results in 1 week or your money back.

Re:Bigger data (1)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | about three weeks ago | (#47732683)

It's obviously, The Big O [youtube.com] .

Next up: embiggened data (4, Funny)

enjar (249223) | about three weeks ago | (#47730433)

It's a perfectly cromulent buzzword

Re:Next up: embiggened data (1)

fightermagethief (3645291) | about three weeks ago | (#47735013)

I never even knew that word existed until I started reading slashdot.

Re:Next up: embiggened data (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47737377)

Please try to watch the use of schrisms on slashdot.

What about outside business? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47730437)

What kind of technology might be used in the idleness world?

Docker and compartments? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47730449)

Docker appears to have a lot of interest and seems to be approaching critical mass. The fact that one can deploy an application, as well as the entire environment that program runs in can be useful in the enterprise.

Nothing is after big D (1)

bluefoxlucid (723572) | about three weeks ago | (#47730455)

Literally everyone wants nothing more than a big D.

Re:Nothing is after big D (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about three weeks ago | (#47731121)

Big "D"?

Do you mean Dallas?

Re:Nothing is after big D (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47732475)

Big "D"?

Do you mean Dallas?

no no. D is for Delight.

You seem like the kind of person who would find a big D right up your alley.

Open up; wrap your lips around one; It should make your day.

If that doesn't work for you, sit down and think on it for a while. Just let it sink in and you should feel it in no time. Delightful!

Common sense (3, Interesting)

WaffleMonster (969671) | about three weeks ago | (#47730473)

After big data they will hire people to think and actually produce useful/actionable insights.

After that they will hire thinking machines.

After that .. with the last vestiges of humanity in zoo's for the amusement of machines .. it's anyone's guess.

Re:Common sense (2)

s.petry (762400) | about three weeks ago | (#47731051)

After big data they will hire people to think and actually produce useful/actionable insights.

Haha, you wish!

Marketing will just start a new buzzword trend. Investors will all dump shit tons of money into projects believing it's the new ".com" and try to cash in. Management will think it's the "next big thing" sheep will perform their normal function of following the herd. Techies will all scratch their heads wondering why people continue to fall into the game of hype, and continue to believe that one day people will learn.

Techies don't pull the purse strings, and until that changes the market will remain in the same cycle.

Re:Common sense (1)

nine-times (778537) | about three weeks ago | (#47731367)

Common sense will never come into style, and "they" will never hire people to think and actually produce useful/actionable insights. You see, it's a bit of a catch-22. No one will make good decisions until someone sensible is in charge, but we'll never put sensible people in charge until we've started making good decisions. It's ignorant sociopaths all the way down.

Selling shit. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47730475)

Together, these efforts highlight where emerging data technologies might actually be used in the business world.

In the end, it is always about selling us more shit.

Big Marketing (1)

Peter Kingsbury (3046159) | about three weeks ago | (#47730479)

Think Minority Report-style marketing.

What's after? (3, Interesting)

makotech222 (1645085) | about three weeks ago | (#47730525)

Big Garbage(can). Most of the data is worthless

Re:What's after? (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about three weeks ago | (#47731205)

Big Garbage(can). Most of the data is worthless

Yes, but the trick is finding the bits of it that are not worthless, and doing it in such a way you can make a profit.

It's like mining when from a guy with a shovel, to large industrial sized drag lines that can scoop up a pile of dirt the size of a house.

The REAL money isn't in "big data" but about collecting and refining it into little bits of data.

Re:What's after? (1)

Concerned Onlooker (473481) | about three weeks ago | (#47733289)

I thought the idea of big data was that looking at ALL the data obviated the need to sample the data and all the attendant issues that come with that. Ferreting out bits and pieces of the big data set is a step backward from the idea of big data. Real numbers people can jump in here and set me straight.

However, my biggest hope for what is after big data is no one ever again having the title "Data Scientist."

Re:What's after? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47733103)

Big Garbage(can). Most of the data is worthless

Yup. Just look at the story above this one on the home page. Correlation BS is going to go rampant and a bunch of stupid will ensue, that's what happens after Big Data, Big Fuck Ups!

IoT (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47730537)

The next big thing is the Internet of Tiresome trends and things. Then once we have every thing on the 'net, it'll be the Internet of Bots From Hell.

Ultra Data (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47730551)

Why, it is obviously Ultra Data.

So Ultra.

After Big Data? No Doubt... (1)

Dan Askme (2895283) | about three weeks ago | (#47730559)

More buzzwords conjured up by marketing wannabe's.

I'd love these buzzwords creators to define their buzzwords. Would make our world less clueless and a more informative race.

if(Data >= 1TB)
{
        bBigData = true;
}

Was that so hard mr.Marketing?

another meaningless buzzword (2)

globaljustin (574257) | about three weeks ago | (#47730595)

TFA's question answered is in headline

Re:another meaningless buzzword (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47733331)

Slashdot is after big data?

By your buzzwords combined... (2)

MiKM (752717) | about three weeks ago | (#47730651)

Cloud Data. Now if you'll excuse me, I'm going to create a phony website to attract suckers investors.

Mega data, of course. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47730657)

Then Giga, Tera, Exa, and Peta.

The hype of big data hasn't ended, only mutated into Slashvertisements like these.

huge data (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47730665)

followed by massive data, and ginormous data

Deep Learning (2)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about three weeks ago | (#47730695)

Deep Learning is the next marketing buzzword, perhaps with good reason this time.

Re:Deep Learning (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47735145)

Already Google has Hinton, FB has Yann LeCun and Baidu has acquired Andrew Ng. It would seem the big houses are preparing for something big - business-wise. Deep learning products are already in use.

Re:Deep Learning (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47740827)

Deep Data, might work.

Big Mac (1)

ctrl-alt-canc (977108) | about three weeks ago | (#47730763)

How do you want it ? Rare, medium or well done ?

Re:Big Mac (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47730881)

Rare. I prefer to have Big Macs as rarely as possible.

Big Lore (1)

SleepyHappyDoc (813919) | about three weeks ago | (#47730805)

Of course!

Re:Big Lore (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47732185)

Of course!

Is that a NAS in you pocket or are you just happy to see me?

Hmmm... I'm just not feeling it.

It's quite obvious (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47730901)

It's quite obvious what comes after big data: explosive growth in secure data disposal businesses and drive shredder manufacturers.

Every industry needs somebody to clean up after them. :)

Re:It's quite obvious (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about three weeks ago | (#47731247)

Didn't we solve that problem on Linux already? I've never heard of /dev/null getting full have you?

Big Data +1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47731009)

Meta data about big metadata data , creating a self perpetuating feed back loop of shit you don't want, and yet costs a lot to store.

Hopefully a return to real science (4, Insightful)

DarkOx (621550) | about three weeks ago | (#47731063)

The problem with 'Big Data' is everyone is trying to use it as a substitute for actual hypothesizing and experimentation.

I am not suggesting it isn't useful, it is, and it can be a huge help in identifying non-intuitive relationships that may exist. Its not being marketed that way though! Everyone is trying to sell it as the solution to all their unresolved problems and knowledge gaps.

At the end of the day all it can ever show is correlation, never causation. All the fancy AIs we add on top are really just correlation engines as well. One day real-soon-now WATSON or something like it will diagnose your cancer. It won't 'discover' the cure though, it will just apply the 'KNOWN' treatment that statistically correlates with the best outcome, hopefully excluding some which correlate with especially un pleasant side effects.

Same is true with the financial markets. Big Data alone will never discover a unified theory that explains market behavior. It will probably make a handful of people stupid amounts of money based again or event correlation and speed. As long as those are the drivers though we will remain forever at risk of sudden meltdowns.

Re:Hopefully a return to real science (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about three weeks ago | (#47731267)

Very true.. Wish I had points today!

Mod parent up!

Re:Hopefully a return to real science (1)

OnioOnio (1366661) | about three weeks ago | (#47731395)

Agreed 1000 times over. The same problem Big Data has faces statistics in general... a lot of people have been convinced that a tool created to aid human/scientific insight is now the insight itself. And these big-data/statistical insights are rarely useful, except in squeezing out extra business pennies at the expense of human agency.

Re:Hopefully a return to real science (1)

aralin (107264) | about three weeks ago | (#47732601)

The way mind comes from input to knowledge is first through "analysis of data", then sorting the data through search for "analogy" and in the end "synthesis" of the sorted data based on new hypothesis to verify correctness of understanding. I'd call those Map / Reduce / Produce. Many people are forgetting the last part, the verification. That turns the whole process into experimentation and results in new hypothesis or true understanding.

Big Data is really good at the Analysis and Analogy part of the process, but less so with the Hypothesis and Synthesis part. Still at the amounts of data we have it gives you the tools to do thinking and understanding at much larger scale.

Re:Hopefully a return to real science (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47735149)

With improved tools, human ingenuity and intuition can reach even higher. Computers are partners in this journey, not just executants.

Re:Hopefully a return to real science (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47737505)

>At the end of the day all it can ever show is correlation, never causation. All the fancy AIs we add on top are really just correlation engines as well.

No, not nearly true. Inference engines infer causation, not correlation. Correlation is the starting point of the analysis.

And it's often true that correlation itself is enormously valuable, even without causation. Comments above to the effect that most archived personal data is valueless are newbie-level clueless. The idea here is to accumulate as much information as possible because the size of the data repository allows meaningful patterns to be inferred from data that appears random, or meaningless, when viewed from too close a perspective. Furthermore, inferences may be built on inferences, so a new piece of seemingly meaningless data may reveal something vitally important when integrated into a knowledgebase already informed by previously structured, seemingly meaningless, data.

I believe that the public (at least tech firms) may finally be starting to become more aware of how these systems work. I notice that increasing numbers of people here are posting AC, as they become increasingly aware that even using a correlatable nick facilitates exploitation of data already organized into a well-stocked mature ontology. There's a guy here who rants about Slashdot's refusal to allow users to change nicks (or cancel accounts) and although the site has seemingly been blowing him off, he seems to be one of the few who fully understands the issues. Suppressing trolls (& it's not clear that such policies have been an effective wayof doing so) is one thing, but helping protect, even in a small way, user privacy vs. data miners seems to me to trump.

You are aware, of course, that every word you post on this site is likely stored in many archives secreted around the world?

Duh... (1)

ProZachar (410739) | about three weeks ago | (#47731089)

Judging from all the new aggregated travel sites that say they search "all travel sites to get you the best price", my guess is an aggregated big data warehouse that searches "all big data to get you the best target profile for your advertising. Canoe(tm). Search one and done, the best profile for the right price. Guaranteed."

Marketing vs technology (1)

michaelmalak (91262) | about three weeks ago | (#47731097)

From the linked piece:

In hindsight, his remark was a clear sign that the marketing hype around "big data" had peaked.

This is true, and it provides the context missing from TFS: "Big Data" is over as a marketing term. But as technological term and as far as actual implementation, it is the status quo and forevermore will be.

From a technological perspective, "Big Data" has a simple definition: more data than can be stored on a single machine. And this need will only grow as hard drives and maybe even SSDs plateau [datascienceassn.org] while of course enterprise data only grows.

Indeed, TFA itself states (that TFS omitted):

A particularly hot sector has matured around Hadoop, an open-source analytics software platform. Many tech companies are writing software to make Hadoop industrial strength and integrate it with new and existing types of databases.

So, from TFA itself: Hadoop is hot, but the term "Big Data" is not.

Re: What's after Big Data (1)

istartedi (132515) | about three weeks ago | (#47731147)

Ads on the insides of your eyelids, random "disappearances", a stock market crash or two, a bunch of middle-aged White guys who achieved one thing and are now kicking back and raking it in as pundits, WW3, roving bands of thugs allied with motorcycle gangs terrorizing the nation, or any number of other random things that might be benign or catastrophic.

I predict "Big Code" ... (2)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | about three weeks ago | (#47731217)

... distributed across a multiple heterogeneous platforms.

Big hard drive failure (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47731289)

Wait for it.

What's afer Big Data? Obviously its.... (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about three weeks ago | (#47731309)

/dev/null At least on Linux machines where we solved this problem decades ago.

If you have windows, that recycle bin is going to be REALLY full and I'm not sure how you are going to empty it with just a mouse.

What's After Big Data? (1)

pitchpipe (708843) | about three weeks ago | (#47731493)

What's After Big Data?

Big Brother, and after he finds out what you are guilty of: the Big House. Then comes Big Love with Big Bubba and his Big Little Bubba. Next is Big Money for Big Medical to fix up your Big Rectum.

ludicrous data? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47731529)

because why not?

Psychohistory (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47731623)

Obviously.

How much big data is because companies want it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47731683)

Many folks have started saying never delete any data now in case you want it later then as it builds up finally results in enough of it to warrant using big data techniques. Never mind the fact that it only gets implemented because of this sentiment of never delete anything. Neat don't pay the bills.

Web Components ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47731913)

This isn't a joke but for real.

We're at arrival of big change how Web applications are written. The Web Components are the next buzzword. You haven't heard of it watch Eric Biedelmans intro [youtube.com] to the subject from Polymer Project [polymer-project.org] web pages, please.

Seriously if you are SE building web apps, embedded control software with web-gui or whatever, this will change how you work!

It is called "LevSyn Data" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47732033)

aka "Leveraging Synergistic Data" - going to be every PHB's arsenal of BS catch phrases.

Big Dick (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47732059)

Internet of Fucks

Scammers (1)

Cammi (1956130) | about three weeks ago | (#47732139)

uhh ... "big data" has been around since the 1940s, and solved. It is surprising how many scamming/snake oil companies are out there

Dear Slashdot, (1)

ADRA (37398) | about three weeks ago | (#47732141)

Coming up with my own startup is just too hard to do. Instead, can one of you think of a cool technology I can half-assed write in the hopes of getting a huge payout from some monolithic corp decides that they-too want to jump into the hot market of the moment?

Logically (1)

warm_warmer (3029441) | about three weeks ago | (#47732449)

Big Spock

Re:Logically (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47744641)

I'm veering left unexpectedly, with Big Worf!

The problem with "big data" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47733695)

Is that it's turned into a marketing/sales buzzword that has lost its original meaning. I work at a startup who has about 900 megabytes of data and the CTO keeps telling clients we use "Big data"

umm our database is wayyyyyyyyy too small to be considered "big data"

*cough*ExtraHop*cough* (1)

skinlayers (621258) | about three weeks ago | (#47733851)

Full disclosure/shameless plug: I work internal IT for ExtraHop Networks.

Analytics platforms like ExtraHop do the analysis on streams of data in real-time so that what gets sent to the Big Data store (such as Elasticsearch) is structured or clean data that's more immediately useful.

IoT (0)

Anonymous Coward | about three weeks ago | (#47738139)

http://www.networkworld.com/article/2464007/cloud-computing/gartner-internet-of-things-has-reached-hype-peak.html

Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>